Mar. 6th, 2006

rfmcdonald: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] eveglass summarizes. Yes, I'm the half-elf sorcerer 60 years of age.
rfmcdonald: (Default)
I can't recommend highly enough said post ("The Endless Journey") examining the Roma as a European (read Western) diaspora that, unlike better-known and better-liked diasporas luike the Jewish and the Armenian, constructs its lifeworld on principles rather distinct from those of its neighbours.
rfmcdonald: (Default)
Writing in his regular column in fab, Brad Fraser announces ("No more dead fags, please") his profound unhappiness with the conclusion of Brokeback Mountain.

I am so tired of dead faggots. They’ve been a staple of literature and drama for so long, I’m surprised they’re not outlawed. In humankind’s first recorded saga, Gilgamesh loved the only man who was his match, Enkidu. But Enkidu was killed by the gods to punish Gilgamesh for his vanity. This set a deadly precedent for man-on-man love that continues today. In fact, the 20th century was particularly enamoured with dead fags, especially in film (although the plays of Tennessee Williams give movies a run for their money). From the very first Academy Award-winning film, Wings, to The Children’s Hour, Rebel Without a Cause, Midnight Cowboy, Philadelphia and Boys Don’t Cry, to name only the most obvious, Hollywood has heaped praise and awards on its deceased queers. Even more disturbingly, it is always the “gayer” character who dies. Like Plato in Rebel and Ratso Rizzo in Cowboy, Gyllenhaal’s Jack Twist is the one who wants to talk about his feelings and have a relationship, so naturally he gets axed. I know a lot of people adore this tragic love story thing and I wouldn’t be so cynical about it if gay love stories had a happy ending once in a while. But on those rare occasions when they do, they’re instantly relegated – mostly by straight male critics – to a homosexual subgenre and die a sad death at the box office.


He has a point. And yet, E. Annie Proulx is a fiction writer known for her relentless realism, relentless even when depressing because it's true, because it's how the world is. In the intermountain West of the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s, would it have been likely for this story have had any other outcome but what we first read then saw? I hae ma doots. It's depressing as all hell, but maybe it's better--politically, dramatically--to press for happy conclusions for stories fortunate enough to be located in the times and the place when happy conclusions are possible.
rfmcdonald: (Default)
I finally picked up Kate Bush's "King of the Mountain" single today. Of course I have the song already on mp3. It's true that I needed to buy the single anyway, in order to reward one of my favourite artists. As if to reward the devoted fan, the B-side was her cover of "Sexual Healing." That song is available here, at the Kate Bush in Mp3 website. That version of the song is terribly scratchy, sadly, even after reprocessing.

So, how is the CD-quality version of this famous cover? It's good, and I'm glad that I own it. The thing that I should have kept in mind, alas, is that a scratchy and terribly imperfect song allows the imagination rather more space than one that's technically perfect. It's a good B-side, but it should be a B-side.
rfmcdonald: (Default)
Regarding the Roma, can everyone involve please calm down? Thanks.
rfmcdonald: (Default)
I'm a bit embarrassed that I hadn't been to the Drake Hotel's über-trendy lounge before tonight. Now that I have, I have to say that there's not all that much to it on a non-weekend night, apart from trendy-looking people getting drunk too early and old nature and anthropoligy films projected against an inflatable white cube.
Page generated Sep. 25th, 2017 12:41 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios