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  • blogTO notes that the Toronto Reference Library will be holding a huge sale again next week.

  • Inside Toronto profiles Sephora Hussein, new collection head of the Merril Collection.

  • Michael Lyons writes about the importance of the newly-reopened Hanlan's beach on the Toronto Islands.

  • Jake Tobin Garrett argues at Torontoist for the importance of the proposed Rail Deck Park.

  • Emily Macrae argues at Torontoist there is much Toronto can learn from the green--literally--laneways of Montréal.

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a stunning amateur astronomer's photograph of a gravitationally-lensed galaxy billions of light-years away.

  • Centauri Dreams reports on the successful imaging from Argentina of Kuiper belt object MU69, a possible binary.

  • Dangerous Minds traces the origin of the garden gnome to a time when the rich had people in their gardens.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper suggesting TRAPPIST-1's inner planets have had their atmospheres burned off.

  • Language Hat notes the struggle to rid Appalachian dialects of English of their stigma.

  • Language Log compares Chinese, Greek, and Latin, as classical languages of philologists.

  • Marginal Revolution reports that a new job is that of intimacy director, guiding actors and others in intimate scenes.

  • Neuroskeptic reports on an apparently solid paper suggesting female brains are more active than male ones.

  • Noel Maurer notes that, although Venezuela's system of government was alert to fraud, its leaders responded by not caring and moving ahead.

  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on a visit to post-Jammeh Gambia.

  • Strange Maps reports on a bizarre 1920 proposal to unite Europe and divide it into regions shape like pie slices.

  • Towleroad notes that Karl Stefanovic thinks Australian politicians' treatment of same-sex marriage is disrespectful.

  • Window on Eurasia notes a study saying Tajik immigrants in Moscow adapt better than migrants from provincial Russia.

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The formal garden of Fanningbank seemed to be somewhat past its peak at the end of July, but it was still carefully manicured, and still enjoyed the benefits of its location between the cool blue of Charlottetown Harbour and the dense green trees of Victoria Park.

Garden of Fanningbank (1) #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #fanningbank #garden


Garden of Fanningbank (2) #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #fanningbank #garden


Garden of Fanningbank (3) #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #fanningbank #garden


Garden of Fanningbank (4) #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #fanningbank #garden


Garden of Fanningbank (5) #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #fanningbank #garden


Garden of Fanningbank #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #fanningbank #garden


Garden of Fanningbank (6) #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #fanningbank #garden


Garden of Fanningbank (7) #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #fanningbank #garden #victoriapark


Garden of Fanningbank #pei #princeedwardisland (8) #charlottetown #fanningbank #garden #victoriapark


Path beyond #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #fanningbank #garden #victoriapark
rfmcdonald: (photo)
Charlottetown's Fanningbank, officially known as Government House and home to the lieutenant-governor of Prince Edward Island, takes it name from the parcel of land it was built on, set aside by the Loyalist administrator Edmund Fanning. A modest mansion built in wood in the Georgian style of the 1830s, Fanningbank for me marks the western end of downtown Charlottetown. To its west lies Victoria Park, the neighbourhood of Brighton, and the North River beyond.

Fanningbank (1)


Fanningbank (2)


Fanningbank (3)
rfmcdonald: (photo)
Prospect Cemetery is different in some noteworthy ways from Mount Pleasant Cemetery, the burying ground that is a natural match for it in size and location. Mount Pleasant is arguably defined by graves of people of British background, sober monuments in stone towering above the lanes. Prospect Cemetery's graves are more multicultural, the graves of southern and eastern Europeans being especially prominent. My eye was caught especially by particular graves, of people of Portuguese background, which were tended to marvelously, bedecked with flowers and grave goods by people who cared.

Manuel Almeida


Antonio Palumbo


Sandy Valinho


Liliana Costa
rfmcdonald: (photo)
The Sullivan Building in its setting #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #sullivanbuilding #latergram


Charlottetown's Sullivan Building is part of the Provincial Administration Building complex located in the extreme west of the downtown between Kent and Fitzroy streets, home to the various offices and bureaus and ministries of the provincial government of Prince Edward Island. The brutalism of the building, and its neighbours, is characteristic of Charlottetown's official architecture in the decades after the Second World War.
rfmcdonald: (obscura)
In memory of the dead of Earlscourt, Toronto


Toronto's Prospect Cemetery extends as far south as St. Clair Avenue, touching Earlscourt. Back when this neighbourhood was a newly-annexed municipality on the northwest fringes of the City of Toronto, Earlscourt was a new communiy, home to many recent British immigrants. These people volunteered by the thousands to serve on the Western Front, and died in the hundreds. After the First World War, this memorial was built in Prospect Cemetery, Earlscourt's local cemetery, in honour of the neighbourhood's dead. Future king Edward VIII lent his presence to the ceremonies surrounding of this cenotaph in 1919.
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  • National Geographic reports on how, unchecked, global warming may wreck the coffee industry of Uganda.

  • Aeon notes the nervous system of the ctenophore, product of a separate evolutionary process from our own.

  • Phys.org describes a recent study suggesting Easter Island was not wrecked by ecocide. (The Rapanui were devastated by others, I would add.)

  • Even with an active magnetic field, an Earth-like atmosphere of Proxima Centauri b might be eroded away by flares. Universe Today reports on the climate model making this prediction.

  • Does bizarre Przybylski’s star, HD 101065, contain exotic superheavy elements in its atmosphere? New Scientist wonders.

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  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly re-introduces herself to her readers.

  • Bruce Dorminey shares one man's theory about how extraterrestrials could use exoplanet sightings to build up a galactic communications network.

  • Far Outliers shares some unusual Japanese words, starting with "amepotu" for American potato.

  • Language Hat takes
  • Did the spokeswoman of the NRA threaten to "fisk" the New York Times or threaten something else? Language Log reports.

  • Drew Rowsome notes that, compared to San Francisco, Toronto does not have much of a public kink scene.

  • Starts With A Bang's Ethan Siegel examines the quantum reasons behind the explosion produced by sodium metal and water.

  • Understanding Society takes rightful issue with The Guardian's shoddy coverage of Dearborn, Michigan, and that city's Muslims and/or Arabs.

  • Unicorn Booty notes that Canada is, at last, starting to take in queer refugees from Chechnya.

  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the embarrassing support for Jean-Luc Mélenchon for Venezuela. Was opposing the US all he wanted?

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  • Scott Wheeler writes about past eminences of Toronto, people like Conn Smythe and Raymond Massey.
  • Joanna Slater writes in The Globe and Mail about the symbolism of Confederate--and other--statuary in Richmond, former capital of the South.

  • Reuters reports on a Vietnamese businessman abducted by his country from the streets of Berlin. Germany is unhappy.

  • Jeremiah Ross argues at VICE that very high levels of tourism in New York City are displacing native-born residents.

  • Looking to protests most recently in Barcelona, Elle Hunt in The Guardian looks at ways to make mass tourism more affordable for destinations.

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  • Torontoist takes on Galen Weston and the $15 minimum wage and poverty in Toronto (and Loblaw's contribution to said).

  • At the Toronto Star, Shawn Micallef describes how high property values in Toronto discourage open-air parking lots.

  • Noor Javed looks, in Toronto Star, at the question of who authorized the cathedral elevated cow statue in Cathedraltown, in Markham.

  • The Star's Fatima Syed shares some old memories of Torontonians of the Centreville carousel, soon to be sold off.

  • At The Globe and Mail, Dakshana Bascaramurty takes a look at Jamaican patois, Toronto black English, and the many complex ways in which this language is received.

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  • Centauri Dreams notes the exobiological potential of Titamn after the detection of acrylonitrile. Cryogenic life?

  • This guest essay at Lawyers, Guns and Money on the existential problems of Brazil, with politics depending on people not institutions, is a must-read.

  • The LRB Blog considers, in the context of Brexit, what exactly might count for some as a marker of dictatorship.

  • Did the 15th century construction of the Grand Canal in China lead the Ming away from oceanic travel? Marginal Revolution speculates.

  • The NYR Daily considers
  • Out There explores the reasons why the most massive planets all have the same size.

  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the 5th anniversary of the arrival of Curiosity on Mars.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer notes that, with regards to Venezuela, the United States has no good options.

  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the febrile political mood of Kenya.

  • Window on Eurasia argues that Putin is making the mistake of seeing the United States through the prism of Russia.

  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes a proposal for British mayors to have representation at Brexit talks makes no sense.

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  • I am glad that Smiths Falls survived--it was lovely when I visited in 2003. If it is marijuana that saved it, good. From Global News.
  • That Oshawa--the 'Shwa, to GTAers--has managed to evolve past dependence on cars is a very good thing indeed. The Toronto Star reports.

  • Can Halifax support the proposed light rail network? This sounds like a good idea, but I would say that, then. Global News describes the proposal.

  • Patrick Cain does a great job analyzing the 2016 Census data on same-sex couples in Canada: distribution, ages, etc. His analysis is at Global News.

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  • Worrying about the relationship of Toronto and nuclear weapons seems very 1980s. What's old is new again, as noted at NOW Toronto.

  • Steve Munro points out that talk of a fare freeze on the TTC ignores the underlying economics. Who, and what, will pay for this?

  • It's nice that the Little Free Pantry is being supported, as Global News observes, but what does it say about our city that this is a thing?

  • Clifton Joseph notes the Toronto Caribbean Festival has never achieved its goals of emancipation. Cue Bakhtin ...

  • Global News notes the new Drake music video promoting his OVO Fest store at Yorkdale. I should go.

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  • Dangerous Minds points readers to Cindy Sherman's Instagram account. ("_cindysherman_", if you are interested.)

  • Language Hat takes note of a rare early 20th century Judaeo-Urdu manuscript.

  • Language Log lists some of the many, many words and phrases banned from Internet usage in China.

  • The argument made at Lawyers, Guns and Money about Trump's many cognitive defects is frightening. How can he be president?

  • The LRB Blog <"a href="https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2017/08/03/lynsey-hanley/labour-and-traditional-voters/">notes that many traditional Labour voters, contra fears, are in fact willing to vote for non-ethnocratic policies.

  • The NYR Daily describes a book of photos with companion essays by Teju Cole that I like.

  • Of course, as Roads and Kingdom notes, there is such a thing as pho craft beer in Vietnam.

  • Peter Rukavina notes
  • Towleroad notes a love duet between Kele Okereke and Olly Alexander.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy seems unconvinced by the charges against Kronos programmer Marcus Hutchins.

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