rfmcdonald: (photo)
Provincial Administration Buildings from the west #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #architecture #brutalism #latergram


Looking east from the driveway of Fanningbank on Terry Fox Drive, the Sullivan Building is visible to left in beige, while the Jones Building is visible in red at right. The Shaw Building, the third building of the Provincial Administration Buildings, lies further east, and is hidden by the Sullivan and Jones buildings.
rfmcdonald: (photo)
Charlottetown's Fanningbank, officially known as Government House and home to the lieutenant-governor of Prince Edward Island, takes it name from the parcel of land it was built on, set aside by the Loyalist administrator Edmund Fanning. A modest mansion built in wood in the Georgian style of the 1830s, Fanningbank for me marks the western end of downtown Charlottetown. To its west lies Victoria Park, the neighbourhood of Brighton, and the North River beyond.

Fanningbank (1)


Fanningbank (2)


Fanningbank (3)
rfmcdonald: (photo)
The Sullivan Building in its setting #pei #princeedwardisland #charlottetown #sullivanbuilding #latergram


Charlottetown's Sullivan Building is part of the Provincial Administration Building complex located in the extreme west of the downtown between Kent and Fitzroy streets, home to the various offices and bureaus and ministries of the provincial government of Prince Edward Island. The brutalism of the building, and its neighbours, is characteristic of Charlottetown's official architecture in the decades after the Second World War.
rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Spacing hosts Cheryl Thompson's article examining Toronto's Caribbean festival as a Bakhtinian organized chaos.

  • VICE examines how social housing in Canada will be hard-hit by climate change, including rising temperatures.

  • Torontoist shares a sponsored guide to attractions in the Ontario Greenbelt.

  • Laura Howells at the Toronto Star notes that if garlic mustard has to be an invasive plant in the forests of Ontario, at least it helps that it is a tasty invader.

  • Julien Gignac reports on the mystery of who the artist building shrines at Leslie Spit actually is.

rfmcdonald: (photo)
One New York City poster of three


Two New York City posters of three


I bought these posters, neatly framed behind glass, from a now-defunct store in downtown Charlottetown--Zellers?--when I was 10 or so. These posters have remained on my bedroom wall ever since, even after I moved. From skyscraper skylines on my walls to skyscraper skylines outside my walls, I've gone.
rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • John Michael McGrath argues at TVO that leaving Toronto for Ontario cities with cheaper housing misses the issue of jobs. For starters.

  • Michelle McQuigge looks at how the CNIB is helping make Yonge and St. Clair accessible to the blind.

  • In The Globe and Mail, Erik Heinrich looks at how a mid-rise office tower at 1133 Yonge Street is being transformed into condos.

  • The Toronto Star reports that the condo/hotel tower at 325 Bay Street no longer bears the name of Trump. Toronto is free!

  • The end of the Palace Arms rooming house at King and Strachan, Christian Controneo notes at Torontoist, must be seen as terrible for the people who live there.
  • blogTO notes that E. Coli levels on mainland Toronto beaches make them unsafe for swimmers. No lake water this year!

  • blogTO notes that Montréal architect Claude Cormier, designer of HTO and Berczy, will next do a cat-themed park.

rfmcdonald: (photo)
Picasso on Richmond #toronto #architecture #condos #picassocondos #richmondstreet #entertainmentdistrict #queenstreetwest #picassoonrichmond #latergram


Picasso on Richmond #toronto #architecture #condos #picassocondos #richmondstreet #entertainmentdistrict #queenstreetwest #picassoonrichmond #latergram


Picasso on Richmond is an eye-catching tower in the heart of the Entertainment District, a 39-story condo tower with what Urban Toronto is right to note is a "decidedly edgy silhouette", all different colours and shapes.
rfmcdonald: (photo)
The Queen Richmond Centre West (134 Peter Street) is a interesting building, a modern glass tower built on and around an old brick warehouse. The weight is partly supported, as noted by architects Sweeny&Co, by Mega Delta Frames visible in the photos: "After a year of research and development, the team found a solution to structurally support the new tower over the top of the existing historic structures. They designed Mega Delta Frames—using three, each is capable of supporting forces of 80,000kN. The legs of the Mega Delta Frames are pressure-filled with concrete which, in composite action with tubular steel sections, contributes to the structural capacity of the frame and further contributes to the relative slenderness of the legs. Each leg is 40-inches in diameter with a steel thickness of 2-inches. The inherent lateral stability of the Mega Delta-Frames provide the majority of the building’s structure, allowing for only a single reinforced concrete stair and elevator core to descend down through the atrium, thus providing full visual exposure."

Queen Richmond Centre West, top


Queen Richmond Centre West, bottom
rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence that pitted terrain, as found on Ceres and Vesta, indicates subsurface ice.

  • Dead Things links to evidence suggesting insomnia and poor sleep are not disorders, but rather evolutionary inheritances that were useful in the past.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the critical human role in the ongoing sixth extinction.

  • Language Hat links to speculation that the Afroasiatic language family has its origins in the Natufian Levant.

  • The LRB Blog reports on a fascinating French show about espionage, Le Bureau des légendes.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw reports on an important speech by Malcolm Turnbull on politics and Australia's Liberal Party.

  • The Planetary Society Blog shares Marc Rayman's report on the latest discoveries of Dawn at Ceres.

  • Spacing' Sean Ruthven has a review of a beautiful book on the Sea Ranch, a northern California estate.

  • Back in May, Septembre Anderson argued at Torontoist that rather than embracing diversity, Canadian media was more willing to wither.

  • Window on Eurasia shares an argument suggesting Baltic Russians would not follow the Donbas into revolt because the Baltics are much better off economically.

rfmcdonald: (photo)
The Anne Johnston Courtyard, located in the middle of the Minto Midtown complex, just south of Eglinton on Yonge, is a very nice green space cradled between the complex's two towers. Praised by the likes of The Globe and Mail and blogTO as one of the top hidden public spaces in Toronto since it was opened in 2008, the Anne Johnston Courtyard is an example of a great privately-owned publicly-accessible space. Ryan Starr reported in the Toronto Star in 2010 that this park was an integral part of the design team's environmentally-friendly plans.

Standing in the courtyard of MintoMidtown, Andrew Pride beams with delight as he lists off the property's various green design elements.

The vice-president of Minto's "green team" notes the LED exterior lighting, which provides ample illumination but uses minimal energy.

He directs his visitor's attention to chairs made from recycled steel, and to a rainwater-fed fountain with wind sensors that ensure the water doesn't blow all over passersby in the event of a sudden gust.

Pride points out that the limestone used throughout the courtyard is locally sourced, which cut down on transportation-related emissions.

"The courtyard is a great gathering place," he says of the two-tower highrise condo on Yonge St. just south of Eglinton Ave. "It's the heart of this sustainable community."


As Shawn Micallef observed, inside this well-designed park it's almost possible to forget that one's in the middle of a high-rise condo complex.

Entering the Anne Johnston Courtyard


Fountain and trees


Looking south


Among the potted trees


At play


Carefully green


Looking north
rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • blogTO observes that a former ferry from Halifax is coming to Lake Ontario, to connect mainland Toronto to Centre Island.

  • Shawn Micallef notes in the Toronto Star how Toronto fell for the World's Largest Rubber Duck.

  • Alex Bozikovic notes in The Globe and Mail how Toronto(and other cities) can prepare for climate change by trying to adapt to flooding, not prevent it altogether.

  • CBC notes that the more sunshine Greenland gets, the faster its ice cap melts.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Steve Munro shares some vintage photos of TTC streetcars from Canada's centennial in 1967.

  • Spacing Toronto's Chris Bateman describes how the Toronto Islands became a test-bed for architectural modernism.

  • Global News notes the proposal for a hovercraft service across Lake Ontario, connecting Toronto with Niagara.

  • The Toronto Star's Emily Mathieu notes that a Kensington Market apartment complex made into a ghost hotel has been temporarily shut down by Airbnb.

  • NOW Toronto's Paul Salvatori has a touching photo essay on the Palace Arms, a soon-to-be-gone rooming house at King and Strachan.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • blogTO notes a pretty significant expansion of the University of Toronto's Robarts Library.

  • Spacing Toronto's John Lorinc argues that the plan for waterfront revitalization could be a gamechanger for Toronto as a city.

  • The Toronto Star's Laurie Monsebraaten notes that the number of young children in downtown Toronto is spiking.

  • VICE notes that Toronto housing has become as unaffordable as it ever has been.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Lisa Coxon of Toronto Life shares eleven photos tracking Toronto's queer history back more than a century.

  • Michelle McQuigge reports for the Toronto Star that the Luminous Veil does save lives. I would add that it is also beautiful.

  • In The Globe and Mail, Marcus Gee thinks it makes perfect sense for there to be a dedicated streetcar corridor on King Street.

  • Ben Spurr describes a new plan for a new GO Transit bus station across from Union Station.

  • Emily Mathieu reported in the Toronto Star on how some Kensington Market tenants seem to have been pushed out for an Airbnb hostel.

  • In The Globe and Mail, Irish-born John Doyle explores the new Robert Grassett Park, built in honour of the doctor who died trying to save Irish refugees in 1847.

  • Justin Ling in VICE tells the story of three gay men who went missing without a trace in Toronto just a few years ago. What happened?
rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • The Independent suggests that potentially flammable cladding was mounted on London's Grenfell Tower so as to make it look nicer for richer neighbours. If the lives of the poor were put at risk of burning to make richer neighbours happy ... Wow.

  • Adam Rogers at Wired describes the many complexities regarding fighting high-rise fires and evacuating their inhabitants.

  • CBC suggests that local building codes in Canada are sufficiently stringent to prevent a repetition of the Grenfell Tower tragedy here. One hopes.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Centauri Dreams looks at two brown dwarf pairs, nearby Luhman 16 and eclipsing binary WD1202-024.

  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting panspermia would be easy in the compact TRAPPIST-1 system.

  • Far Outliers notes the shouted and remarkably long-range vocal telegraph of early 20th century Albania.

  • Language Hat links to a fascinating blog post noting the survival of African Latin in late medieval Tunisia.

  • The LRB Blog notes the observations of an Englishman in Northern Ireland that, after the DUP's rise, locals are glad other Britons are paying attention.

  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting that refugees in the US end up paying more in taxes than they receive in benefits.

  • Spacing reviews a fascinating-sounding new book on the politics and architecture of new libraries.

  • Understanding Society examines the mechanisms through which organizations can learn.

  • Window on Eurasia talks about the progressive detachment of the east of the North Caucasus, at least, from wider Russia.

rfmcdonald: (photo)
The observation deck of Toronto's Canada Life Building provides a remarkable vantage point on downtown Toronto, even now in the era of skyscrapers and condo towers everywhere.

View west


View south (looking down)


View south (looking up)


View east
rfmcdonald: (photo)
Osgoode Hall, the handsome Georgian building t Queen and University downtown that houses most of Ontario's higher courts, was open for Doors Open. I was taken by its libraries, including not only the American Room where American law texts are stored but the gorgeous, columnned Main Reading Room.

IMG_20170528_150423


IMG_20170528_150704


IMG_20170528_150721


IMG_20170528_150742


IMG_20170528_150755


IMG_20170528_150818


IMG_20170528_150826


IMG_20170528_150849
rfmcdonald: (photo)
1 Spadina Crescent, an address located on a roundabout in Spadina Avenue just north of College, is a handsome Gothic Revival building now home to the University of Toronto's John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture. On the final day of Doors Open, the newly renovated building's doors were opened to the public to tour, through galleries and up stairs and towards all of the spectacular vistas this building's locations provide.

IMG_20170528_133530


IMG_20170528_133706


IMG_20170528_134031


IMG_20170528_134148


IMG_20170528_134312


IMG_20170528_134402


IMG_20170528_134557


IMG_20170528_134618


IMG_20170528_134722

Profile

rfmcdonald: (Default)rfmcdonald

August 2017

S M T W T F S
   1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 1112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Aug. 18th, 2017 02:34 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios