rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Crooked Timber's John Quiggin considers imaginable ways to get carbon dioxide in the atmosphere down to 350 ppm by 2100.

  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the tenuous nature of the upper-middle class in America. How is downwards mobility to be avoided, even here?

  • Imageo shows the growth of a sunspot larger than the Earth.

  • Language Hat shares the story of how Manchu script came to be.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the working poor need protection from arbitrary and always-changing work schedules.

  • The LRB Blog notes the geopolitical scramble at the Horn of Africa, starting with bases in Djibouti.

  • The NYR Daily engages with an intriguing exhibition about the relationship between Henry James and paintings, and painting.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw engages with the classic 1937 Australian film, Lovers and Luggers.

  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money notes that one benefit of the trend towards greater informality in fashion is that time has been freed up, especially for women.

  • Peter Rukavina writes about his new Instagram account, hosting his various sketches.

  • Unicorn Booty notes the continuing problems with Germany's adoption laws for same-sex couples.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at how the Polish president saved the independence of Poland's courts with his veto.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia is trying to mobilize the ethnic Russians of Lithuania, finally.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Crooked Timber links the near-criminal destruction of Grenfell Tower with Thatcherism's deregulations and catastrophes.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes that TRAPPIST-1e is slated to be among the first observational targets of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  • Far Outliers shares Edith Durham's account of an exciting St. John's Day in Albania in 1908.

  • Language Hat looks at a passage from Turgenev.

  • What, the LRB wonders, will Emmanuel Macron do with his crushing victory after the parliamentary elections, too?

  • Marginal Revolution wonders to what extent is Germany's support for Nord Stream consistent with Germany's concerns over NATO and Russia.

  • Ed Jackson's Spacing Toronto article about the need to preserve queer public history in Toronto is a must-read.
  • Torontoist's Alex Yerman notes the new activity of the Jewish left against a conservative establishment.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests that modern Russia is repeating the Soviet Union's overmilitarization mistakes, only this time with fewer resources.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Beyond the Beyond notes an image of a wooden model of Babbage's difference engine.

  • James Bow talks about the soundtrack he has made for his new book.

  • Centauri Dreams considers ways astronomers can detect photosynthesis on exoplanets and shares images of Fomalhaut's debris disk.

  • Crooked Timber looks at fidget spinners in the context of discrimination against people with disabilities.

  • D-Brief notes that Boyajian's Star began dimming over the weekend.

  • Far Outliers reports on a 1917 trip by zeppelin to German East Africa.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues that there is good reason to be concerned about health issues for older presidential candidates.

  • The NYRB Daily reports on Hungary's official war against Central European University.

  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the origins of modern immigration to Russia in internal Soviet migration.

  • Savage Minds shares an ethnographer's account of what it is like to look to see her people (the Sherpas of Nepal) described.

  • Strange Maps shares a map speculating as to what the world will look like when it is 4 degrees warmer.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy argues that the US Congress does not have authority over immigration.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia's population will be concentrated around Moscow, compares Chechnya's position vis-à-vis Russia to Puerto Rico's versus the United States, and looks at new Ukrainian legislation against Russian churches and Russian social networks.

  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes how Evelyn Waugh's writings on the Horn of Africa anticipate the "Friedman unit", the "a measurement of time defined as how long it will take until things are OK in Iraq".

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly writes about the need for opponents of Trump to fight, not just the man but the root causes.

  • Centauri Dreams notes a study suggesting Proxima Centauri is gravitationally bound to Alpha Centauri A and B.

  • Dangerous Minds shares photos depicting the devastation of Gatlinburg by fire.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes that stars with close-orbiting rocky worlds seem to have above-solar metallicity, and considers the albedos of exoplanets.

  • Far Outliers looks at how Poland's Communist government tried to undermine Pope John Paul II in 1979.

  • Joe. My. God. notes a lawsuit lodged against the American government demanding the release of information regarding the Russian information hack.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes poor working conditions in Bangladesh.

  • Marginal Revolution notes a Yoruba tongue twister.

  • The Planetary Society Blog links to China's planned program of space exploration.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • blogTO notes that a Vancouver nerd bar is opening up shop in Toronto.

  • Dangerous Minds provides its readers with a take on an upcoming Tom of Finland biopic.

  • The Dragon's Tales notes that Enceladus seems altogether too hot and notes that dwarf planet Makemake seems to have a surprisingly uniform surface.

  • Far Outliers looks at Afghanistan and Poland at the end of the 1970s.

  • Joe. My. God. and Towleroad each respond to the untimely death of George Michael.
  • Language Log explores the evolution of the term "dongle".

  • Marginal Revolution wonders if Donald Trump is guided by his thinking in the 1980s about a Soviet-American condominium.

  • Torontoist looks at the Toronto's century house plaques come to be.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russian media outside of Russia are gaining in influence and talks about modern Russia as a new sort of "evil empire".

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • blogTO notes that after the Berlin attack, the Toronto Christmas Market has upped its security.

  • D-Brief looks at how roads divide ecosystems.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes that WD 1536+520 apparently has solar levels of rock-forming elements.

  • Language Log examines central European metaphors for indecipherable languages.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is diffident on the question of whether Sanders could have won versus Trump.

  • Marginal Revolution looks at the recent depreciation of Canada's natural resources.

  • The Planetary Society Blog talks about a recent essay collection noting the strides made in planetary science over the past quarter-century.

  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares photos from her trip to Hawai'i.

  • Seriously Science notes Santa's risk of personal injury.

  • Torontoist looks at a University of Toronto professor's challenges to a law on gender identity.

  • Whatever's John Scalzi likes what Disney has done, and is doing, to Star Wars.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russians might want fascism but lack a leader and argues Western defeatism versus Russia is as ill-judged now as it was in 1979.

rfmcdonald: (Default)
At Transitions Online, Martin Ehl writes about how central European disinterest in the Dalai Lama maps onto an increasingly pragmatic pursuit of Chinese investment.

In this way, the October visit of the Dalai Lama – who was the main star of the 20th edition of the Forum 2000 conference, founded by late President Vaclav Havel – was also a test of Havel’s legacy in the former Czechoslovakia. That humanitarian approach is today confined to almost hidden corners of the local political scene, only revived from time to time by small groups, usually consisting of NGO activists, and lately by Kiska. In mainstream politics, it gets almost completely forgotten.

Lastly, the episode illustrates in broader strokes the emerging relationship between Central Europe and China. For the last couple of years, China has crafted its policy toward Europe, and the weak and often Eurosceptic Central European governments have seemed an ideal gateway for Chinese money and political influence. China could thereby reach the wider European Union, which, due to the refugee crisis and Brexit, looks weaker than ever in the last 20 years.

The job, however, isn’t easy for Chinese diplomats in Prague, Bratislava, or Warsaw (the Dalai Lama also briefly visited Wroclaw, without meeting any government official there). They have to exert maximum effort, show off their supposed powers to influence investment, and gain leverage over local politicians. But the real work in leaning on the locals is done by the businessmen who have cultivated business and political ties in China as relations have warmed. That’s not so tough when the United States, a traditional ally, seems so far off, the EU looks to be in disarray, and Russia plays old, familiar Soviet power games.
rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Beyond the Beyond notes an upcoming exhibition of photos of Vaclav Havel.

  • blogTO notes a local controversy over the demolition of a community-built skate park.

  • Centauri Dreams considers how advanced starfaring civilizations might deal with existential threats.

  • Crooked Timber looks at how presidential debates could be used to teach logic.

  • Language Hat examines the origins of the evocative Slavic phrase "they perished like Avars."

  • Language Log notes how "Molotov cocktail" was confused by a Trump manager with "Mazel tov cocktail".

  • The LRB Blog notes Brexit-related insecurity over the rule of law in the United Kingdom.

  • The Map Room Blog notes an exhibition in Maine of Acadian-related maps.

  • Marginal Revolution looks at how the Hong Kong press has been influenced by advertisers.

  • The NYRB Daily looks an exhibition of abstract expressionism.

  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at what we can learn from Rosetta.

  • Savage Minds considers the place of archeology in anthropology.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at Belarus' commemoration of the Bolshevik Revolution and considers the dispute in Kazakhstan as to whether the country should be known as Qazaqstan.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • blogTO shares photos of the new Yonge-Eglinton Centre.

  • Beyond the Beyond's Bruce Sterling makes the comparison of the Middle East now to central Europe in the Thirty Years War.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes the discovery of a hot Jupiter orbiting a T Tauri star just two million years old.

  • Joe. My. God. reports on the conviction of a man who had been accused of involvement in kidnapping the child of same-sex parents.

  • Language Hat reports on the American Jewish accent.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that Republicans are coming to accept Donald Trump.

  • The Map Room Blog reports on a Boston exhibition of Hy-Brasil.

  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the 9th anniversary of the Dawn probe's launch.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer points out that Erik Loomis is wrong, that Ford is not moving jobs to Mexico.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests an isolated Russia might lash out against Belarus, and looks at Putin's support in non-Russian republics.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • blogTO shares the new face of the Broadview Hotel.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly writes about the joys of the unscreened life.

  • Dead Things reports on a study suggesting that although humans are violent by the standards of mammals, we are among the least violent primates.

  • The Dragon's Gaze reports on the discovery of five sizable planets orbiting HIP 41378.

  • Language Log reports on the perils of 7 and 9 in Cantonese.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the usefulness of The Battle of Algiers.

  • The Planetary Society Blog reacts to the Elon Musk proposal for colonizing Mars.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer responds briefly to the question of what Mexico can do about Trump.

  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian invasion of Ukraine has spurred new arms purchases throughout the eastern half of Europe, even in Belarus.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Bloomberg talks about Poland's problems with economic growth, notes that McMansions are poor investments, considers what to do about the Olympics post-Rio, looks at new Japanese tax incentives for working women, looks at a French war museum that put its stock up for sale, examines the power of the New Zealand dairy, looks at the Yasukuni controversies, and notes Huawei's progress in China.

  • Bloomberg View is hopeful for Brazil, argues demographics are dooming Abenomics, suggests ways for the US to pit Russia versus Iran, looks at Chinese fisheries and the survival of the ocean, notes that high American population growth makes the post-2008 economic recovery relatively less notable, looks at Emperor Akihito's opposition to Japanese remilitarization, and argues that Europe's soft response to terrorism is not a weakness.

  • CBC notes that Russian doping whistleblowers fear for their lives, looks at how New Brunswick farmers are adapting to climate change, and looks at how Neanderthals' lack of facility with tools may have doomed them.

  • The Globe and Mail argues Ontario should imitate Michigan instead of Québec, notes the new Anne of Green Gables series on Netflix, and predicts good things for Tim Horton's in the Philippines.

  • The Guardian notes that Canada's impending deal with the European Union is not any model for the United Kingdom.

  • The Inter Press Service looks at child executions in Iran.

  • MacLean's notes that Great Lakes mayors have joined to challenge a diversion of water from their shared basin.

  • National Geographic looks at the elephant ivory trade, considers the abstract intelligence of birds, considers the Mayan calendar's complexities, and looks at how the young generation treats Pluto's dwarf planet status.

  • The National Post notes that VIA Rail is interested in offering a low-cost bus route along the Highway of Tears in northern British Columbia.

  • Open Democracy notes that the last Russian prisoner in Guantanamo does not want to go home, and wonders why the West ignores the Rwandan dictatorship.

  • TVO considers how rural communities can attract immigrants.

  • Universe Today suggests sending our digital selves to the stars, looks at how cirrus clouds kept early Mars warm and wet, and notes the discovery of an early-forming direct-collapse black hole.

  • Variance Explained looks at how Donald Trump's tweets clearly show two authors at work.

  • The Washignton Post considers what happens when a gay bar becomes a bar with more general appeal.

  • Wired notes that the World Wide Web still is far from achieving its founders' dreams, looks at how news apps are dying off, and reports on the Univision purchase of Gawker.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • blogTO shares some photos of Toronto in the gritty 1980s.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper examining the habitable zones of post-main sequence stars.

  • Far Outliers notes the ethnic rivalries among First World War prisoners in the Russian interior, and examines how Czechoslovakia got its independence.

  • The Map Room Blog looks at the mapping technology behind Pokémon Go.

  • pollotenchegg looks at how the populations of Ukrainian cities have evolved.

  • Savage Minds considers anthropology students of colour.

  • Transit Toronto notes
  • Window on Eurasia suggests the post-Soviet states built Soviet-style parodies of capitalism for themselves.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Bloomberg notes political despair in Japan's industrial heartland and looks at Argentina's statistical issues.

  • The Globe and Mail reports on Morocco's continued industrialization and describes the fear of a Vancouver-based pop singer for the life of her mother in China.

  • The Inter Press Service notes the recent terror attack in Dhaka, Bangladesh's capital.

  • MacLean's notes the good relations of Israel and Egypt.

  • The National Post reports on recent discoveries of quiet black holes.

  • Open Democracy looks at the connections between migration and housing policy in the United Kingdom.

  • Transitions Online notes how Brexit has wrecked central Europe's relationships with the United Kingdom.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Bloomberg looks at the European cities hoping to poach talent from London post-Brexit, notes central Europe's support for the European Union, looks at how Venezuelans are dealing with broken cars with the car industry gone, and looks at the United Kingdom's already substantial hit.

  • Bloomberg View considers peace in Columbia, notes American infant mortality, looks at China's fears over Brexit and examines China's anti-corruption crackdown.

  • CBC notes the substantial refugee population of Ukraine.

  • The Inter Press Service wonders about the consequences of Brexit for the United Nations.

  • MacLean's notes the beginning of the North American leaders' summit.

  • National Geographic observes the impending end of the ivory trade of Hong Kong.

  • The National Post looks at the Leave voters' regrets.

  • Open Democracy looks at Scotland and also at the post-Brexit environment more generally.

rfmcdonald: (Default)
The Toronto Star's Nicholas Keung describes how at least part of the wrong done by Canada's deportation of Roma refugee claimants under Harper is being undone.

When they were last on Canadian soil, the Pusuma family took sanctuary in a Toronto church as they fought to avoid being sent back to their native Hungary.

On Thursday, 18 months after leaving Canada, Jozsef Pusuma, his wife, Timea Daroczi, and their daughter Viktoria (Lulu) were welcomed back by their loyal supporters who battled for the Roma family’s return.

“I’m happy to be here, back for a free life. I feel home,” said an exhausted Pusuma, as he and his family walked out from the Pearson Internation Airport customs area to the applause of more than a dozen supporters from the Windermere United Church and Romero House.

“Thank you, Canada for giving my family a new life. We have fought for so long and today I’m free.”

Barbara Sheffield, a member of the church, said she was thrilled to see the family back and justice having persevered.
rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • The Dragon's Gaze reports on speculation that the Fermi paradox can be answered by assuming extraterrestrial civilizations have died already.

  • The Dragon's Tales looks at the climate of early Mars.

  • Far Outliers takes a look at ethnic divisions among Austro-Hungarian prisoners of war in Russia.

  • Joe. My. God. reposts his essay on gay pride parades, in all of their diverse and showy glory.

  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting that, in Sweden, lottery winners do not experience improvements in their health.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at the dynamics behind Putin's neo-Soviet nostalgia, and looks at a sketchy prison in North Ossetia.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • The Atlantic notes the import of the assassination of the head of the Taliban.

  • The BBC observes Spotify has more revenues, but is still not making money.

  • Bloomberg suggests Brexit would embolden central European populists and slow down growth, and looks at Coca Cola's end of production in Venezuela.

  • Bloomberg View suggests a new class of educated Chinese professionals will hurt middle-class wages.

  • The CBC notes the lifting of the mandatory evacuation order for northern Alberta oil sands camps.

  • Daily Xtra looks at the importance of Facebook in spreading knowledge to PrEP.

  • Gizmodo notes the proliferation of cephalopods in the world's oceans.

  • The Miami Herald describes how desperate Venezuelans are turning to urban gardening.

  • The National Post looks at Kevin O'Leary's interest in Canadian politics.

  • The Toronto Star reports on the lifting of the American arms sales embargo against Vietnam.

  • Wired notes Grindr can still be hacked to identify users' locations.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Business Insider looks at the sad state of a project to build a Chinese bullet train in Venezuela.

  • Bloomberg notes the profound unconstitutionality of Donald Trump's suggestion that the US national debt might be renounced, looks at the needs of the Brazilian economy, and suggests Poland's economic nationalism is viable.

  • CBC reports that Sinéad O'Connor is safe in Chicago.

  • National Geographic shares hidden pictures of the Cultural Revolution.

  • The National Post notes the discovery of what might be the ruins of an old fort at Lunenburg.

  • Open Democracy suggests that Brexit, by separating the City of London from the European Union, could trigger the end of globalization, also taking a look at the popularity of populism.

  • Reuters notes the softening of the terms of a Chinese-Venezuelan loan arrangement.

  • The Washington Post notes the migration of some Ethiopian-Americans to a booming Ethiopia.

  • Wired looks at how natural gas will be used to move beyond the Haber-Bosch process which has created fertilizer for a century.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Bloomberg looks at the futurology of Huawei, looks at problems in the Ukrainian peace talks, notes progress towards same-sex civil unions in Italy, and notes slowing economic growth in the east of the European Union.

  • Bloomberg View considers the difference between sex and gender in anti-discrimination law in the United States.

  • The Inter Press Service looks at the role of biomass in Africa's economy.

  • Open Democracy notes that Donald Trump appeals to "losers" who want to win.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • 3 Quarks Daily notes a Financial Times article on the rebirth of brutalism.

  • Bloomberg looks at the Polish opposition's upcoming protest and notes the promise of North Korea's leaders not to use nuclear weapons first.

  • CBC notes the likely permanent displacement of many from Fort McMurray and reports on the failure of Marvel's movies to be as progressive as the comics.

  • The Globe and Mail wonders if the NDP will survive.

  • MacLean's notes the Parti Québécois' planned leadership convention this fall.

  • Scientific American notes that global warming makes fires like Fort McMurray's more likely.

  • The Toronto Star notes the likely role of surveillance and predictive policing in the future.

  • Universe Today notes that Enceladus' water jets seem to occur when the moon is furthest from Saturn.

  • Wired notes the lack of an official Google Play desktop app in an article about people who designed a desktop app themselves.

Page generated Aug. 20th, 2017 06:07 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios