rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • The Big Picture shares shocking photos of the Portuguese forest fires.

  • blogTO notes that, happily, Seaton Village's Fiesta Farms is apparently not at risk of being turned into a condo development site.

  • Centauri Dreams notes a new starship discussion group in Delft. Shades of the British Interplanetary Society and the Daedalus?

  • D-Brief considers a new theory explaining why different birds' eggs have different shapes.

  • The Frailest Thing's Michael Sacasas commits himself to a new regimen of blogging about technology and its imports. (There is a Patreon.)

  • Language Hat notes the current Turkish government's interest in purging Turkish of Western loanwords.

  • Language Log's Victor Mair sums up the evidence for the diffusion of Indo-European languages, and their speakers, into India.

  • The LRB Blog notes the Theresa May government's inability post-Grenfell to communicate with any sense of emotion.

  • Marginal Revolution's Tyler Cowen wonders if the alt-right more prominent in the Anglophone world because it is more prone to the appeal of the new.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw wonders if Brexit will result in a stronger European Union and a weaker United Kingdom.

  • Seriously Science reports a study suggesting that shiny new headphones are not better than less flashy brands.

  • Torontoist reports on the anti-Muslim hate groups set to march in Toronto Pride.

  • Understanding Society considers the subject of critical realism in sociological analyses.

  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia's call to promote Cyrillic across the former Soviet Union has gone badly in Armenia, with its own script.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Daily Xtra's Arshy Mann and Evan Balgord report on how the Jewish Defense League plans on marching in Toronto Pride. Grand.

  • Spacing's Shazlin Rahman reports on the Jane's Walk she organized around sites of significance to Muslims around Bloor and Dufferin.

  • The Toronto Star's Nicholas Keung and Raju Mudhar reported earlier this month on the happy reunification of a Syrian couple with their cat.

rfmcdonald: (Default)
I am rather surprised that the phenomenon of the drag queen story hour, where children are ready stories by people in full drag, seems to be becoming mainstream. While I can see how it has become big, given the performativity of the best drag performances and the humour of these and the nature RuPaul's second ascent to mainstream celebrity, I am still surprised.

  • NOW Toronto's Kelly Boutsalis writes about the spread of the Drag Queen Story Hour from Church and Wellesley to Toronto at large, from Yorkville to Leslieville.
  • In MacLean's, Katy MacKinnon explores how the Drag Queen Story Hour has taken off in Winnipeg.

  • Erin McCormack writes for The Guardian about how this is becoming a worldwide thing, even.
  • rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • Lisa Coxon of Toronto Life shares eleven photos tracking Toronto's queer history back more than a century.

    • Michelle McQuigge reports for the Toronto Star that the Luminous Veil does save lives. I would add that it is also beautiful.

    • In The Globe and Mail, Marcus Gee thinks it makes perfect sense for there to be a dedicated streetcar corridor on King Street.

    • Ben Spurr describes a new plan for a new GO Transit bus station across from Union Station.

    • Emily Mathieu reported in the Toronto Star on how some Kensington Market tenants seem to have been pushed out for an Airbnb hostel.

    • In The Globe and Mail, Irish-born John Doyle explores the new Robert Grassett Park, built in honour of the doctor who died trying to save Irish refugees in 1847.

    • Justin Ling in VICE tells the story of three gay men who went missing without a trace in Toronto just a few years ago. What happened?
    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • Crooked Timber links the near-criminal destruction of Grenfell Tower with Thatcherism's deregulations and catastrophes.

    • The Dragon's Gaze notes that TRAPPIST-1e is slated to be among the first observational targets of the James Webb Space Telescope.

    • Far Outliers shares Edith Durham's account of an exciting St. John's Day in Albania in 1908.

    • Language Hat looks at a passage from Turgenev.

    • What, the LRB wonders, will Emmanuel Macron do with his crushing victory after the parliamentary elections, too?

    • Marginal Revolution wonders to what extent is Germany's support for Nord Stream consistent with Germany's concerns over NATO and Russia.

    • Ed Jackson's Spacing Toronto article about the need to preserve queer public history in Toronto is a must-read.
    • Torontoist's Alex Yerman notes the new activity of the Jewish left against a conservative establishment.

    • Window on Eurasia suggests that modern Russia is repeating the Soviet Union's overmilitarization mistakes, only this time with fewer resources.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)
      |
    • AIDS Action Now veteran Tim McCaskell argues in NOW Toronto that the new gay activism reflects the growing diversity of the community, riven by race and income.

    • Steven W. Thrasher argues from a radical position against the presence of police and militarism generally in American Pride marches.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • blogTO reported that York University plans on opening a satellite campus in York Region's Markham. This is a first.

    • Dangerous Minds notes a new, posthumous release from Suidide's Alan Vega.

    • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper considering the detectability of Niven ringworlds around pulsars. (Maybe.)

    • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers burnout among sociology students, and suggests that engagement with issues is key to overcoming it.

    • The Great Grey Bridge's Philip Turner photoblogs his recent Rhode Island vacation.

    • Joe. My. God. reports on the arrest of a Christian activist protesting outside of the Pulse memorial in Orlando.

    • The LRB Blog shares considerable concern that the Democratic Unionists of Northern Ireland are now national powermakers.

    • Spacing Toronto shares the ambitious plan of Buenos Aires to make the city better for cyclists, pedestrians, and mass transit
    • Transit Toronto notes that starting Friday, Metrolinx will co-sponsor $C25 return tickets to Niagara from Toronto.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • Orville Lloyd Douglas is critical of Black Lives Matter on Pride, calling it out for being self-appointed representatives of black Canadians.

    • Alex McKeen writes in the Toronto Star about First Nations groups holding ongoing ceremonies in Queen's Park.

    • Betsy Powell, also in the Star, notes new restrictions and licensing Toronto is set to impose on Airbnb locally.

    • CBC notes that King Street is slated to become a street where transit, particularly streetcars, will have priority over other traffic.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • blogTO describes the changing designs of TTC maps over the past generations.

    • Cody Delistraty links to an article of his contrasting and comparing Donald Trump to Louis XIV.

    • Marginal Revolution shares facts about Qatar in this time of its issues.

    • Peter Rukavina describes the latest innovations in his homebrew blogging.

    • Towleroad notes the sad anniversary of the Pulse massacre in Orlando.

    • Window on Eurasia argues that there is still potent for Idel-Ural, a coalition of non-Russian minorities by the Volga.

    • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell examines how Labour and the Tories made use of Big Data, and how Labour did much better.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • The Independent notes a denial that Scotland's Conservatives will split from the national party. I wonder, thought, if Scotland's political spectrum is going to shift, like Québec's, from a left-right split to a separatist-unionist one?
    • Owen Jones argues in The Guardian that the rampant prejudices of the DUP, including its homophobia, make it an unsuitable coalition partner.

    • Andray Domise argues in MacLean's that a perceived need to fit in means that immigrants can be too ready to dismiss local racisms.

    • Fast Company lets us know that the minimum wage increases in Seattle have not led to higher retail prices.

    • CBC notes the death of Sam Panopoulous, the Canadian man who invented Hawaiian pizza.

    • Adam West, the first man to play Batman on the screen, has died. We all, not just the fandom, are the poorer for his passing.

    • Are the robots not poised to take over our world? What does their absence demonstrate about our underachieving economy? The Atlantic wonders.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • Daily Xtra notes that, in the 1930s, the shops of Yonge and Dundas supported a queer community. The tours described sound interesting.

    • Torontoist's Tricia Wood arguesthat the proposed high speed rail route in southern Ontario is wasteful spending, reflecting a two-tier transit network.

    • Steve Munro crunches data on the Queen Street route to find that buses have an advantage over streetcars.

    • The Toronto Star's Ben Spurr notes that the TTC is planning to noticeably expand its express bus network.

    • NOW Toronto's Lisa Ferguson writes about potential NIMBYism in the opposition to new high-rises in High Park.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the surprisingly exciting British elections. What will come of them?

    • The LRB Blog considers the question of the underlying motivations of pollsters.

    • Marginal Revolution's Tyler Cowen reshares an old column noting the destabilizing effects of Trump on American alliances.

    • The Planetary Society Blog looks at India's new heavy-lift rocket, the GSLV-MK3.

    • Torontoist looks at the City of Toronto's response to the overdose crisis.

    • Towleroad notes that the Japanese city of Sapporo has recognized same-sex relationships.

    • The Volokh Conspiracy argues that the constitutionality of Trump's edicts should not be defined by their being issued by Trump.

    • Window on Eurasia argues that Russian policy towards Ukraine since 1991 has been marked by consistent disinterest in Ukraine going its own way.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • Centauri Dreams describes a new type of planet, the molten hot rubble cloud "synestia".

    • Far Outliers describes the Polish rebels exiled to Siberia in the 19th century.
    • Language Hat looks at words for porridge in Bantuphone Africa.

    • Language Log examines whistling as a precursor to human language.

    • The LRB considers the new normal of the terrorist state of emergency.

    • Marginal Revolution notes the weakness of the Indian labour market.

    • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer tries to explain to Uruguayans how Donald Trump made his mistake on the budget.

    • Savage Minds remembers the late anthropologist of Polynesia and space colonization, Ben Finney.

    • Towleroad examines the rather depressing idea of a porn-dominated sexuality.

    • Understanding Society examines Hindu/Muslim tensions in India.

    • Window on Eurasia reports on the weakness of Belarus' opposition.

    • Arnold Zwicky talks about Arthur Laurents.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • Anthropology.net reports on new evidence that Homo naledi may have used tools, buried their dead, and lived alongside Homo sapiens.
    • Centauri Dreams remembers an abortive solar sail mission to Halley's Comet.

    • Dangerous Minds shares photos of the "Apache" dancers of France.

    • Cody Delistraty writes about Swedish futurist Anders Sandberg and his efforts to plan for humanity's future.

    • At the Everyday Sociology Blog, Karen Sternheimer talks about her day as a sociologist.

    • Joe. My. God. notes the good news that normal young HIV patients can now expect near-normal life expectancies.

    • Language Hat looks at a recent surge of interest in Italian dialects.

    • Language Log looks at the phenomenon of East Asians taking English-language names.

    • The LRB Blog considers the dynamics of the United Kingdom's own UDI.

    • Marginal Revolution looks at the existential issues of a growing Kinshasa still disconnected from the wider world.

    • Steve Munro notes that Metrolinx will now buy vehicles from France's Alstom.

    • The New APPS Blog uses Foucault to look at the "thanatopolitics" of the Republicans.

    • The NYRB Daily looks at Trump's constitutional crisis.

    • Out There considers the issues surrounding the detection of an alien civilization less advanced than ours.

    • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the United States' planetary science exploration budget.

    • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer looks at Argentina's underrated reputation as a destination for foreign investment.

    • Progressive Download shares some thinking about sexual orientation in the context of evolution.

    • Peter Rukavina looks at the success of wind energy generation on the Island.

    • Understanding Society takes a look at the dynamics of Rome.

    • Window on Eurasia shares a lunatic Russian scheme for a partition of eastern Europe between Russia and Germany.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • D-Brief shares rare video of beaked whales on the move.

    • Dangerous Minds notes that someone has actually begun selling unauthorized action figures of Trump Administration figures like Bannon and Spencer.

    • Language Log looks at a linguistic feature of Emma Watson's quote, her ending it with a preposition.

    • Marginal Revolution's Tyler Cowen considers, originally for Bloomberg View, if Trump could be seen as a placebo for what ails America.

    • The New APPS Blog takes a Marxist angle on the issue of big data, from the perspective of (among other things) primitive accumulation.

    • The Search reports on the phenomenon of the Women's History Month Wikipedia edit-a-thon, aiming to literally increase the representation of notable women on Wikipedia.

    • Towleroad notes the six men who will be stars of a new Fire Island reality television show.

    • The Volokh Conspiracy finds some merit in Ben Carson's description of American slaves as immigrants.

    • Window on Eurasia argues that Belarusians are beginning to mobilize against their government and suggests they are already making headway.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • Centauri Dreams reports on asteroid P/2016 G1, a world that, after splitting, is now showing signs of a cometary tail.

    • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers outrage as a sociological phenomenon. What, exactly, does it do? What does it change?

    • Joe. My. God. reports on a new push for same-sex marriage in Germany, coming from the SPD.

    • Lawyers, Guns and Money examines the Alabama government's disinterest in commemorating the Selma march for freedom.

    • Marginal Revolution looks at Oxford University's attempt to recruit white British male students.

    • At the NYRB Daily, Masha Gessen warns against falling too readily into the trap of identifying conspiracies in dealing with Trump.

    • pollotenchegg maps the distribution of Muslims in Crimea according to the 1897 Russian census.

    • Savage Minds takes a brief look at ayahuasca, a ritual beverage of Andean indigenous peoples, and looks at how its legality in the United States remains complicated.

    • Elf Sternberg considers the problems of straight men with sex, and argues they might be especially trapped by a culture that makes it difficult for straight men to consider sex as anything but a birthright and an obligation.

    • The Volokh Conspiracy considers how the complexities of eminent domain might complicate the US-Mexican border wall.

    • Window on Eurasia reports on protests in Russia and argues Belarus is on the verge of something.

    rfmcdonald: (forums)
    This weekend, I've been thinking a lot about Michael Hobbes' very recent Huffington Post article "Together Alone: The Epidemic of Gay Loneliness". I know I'm not alone in this, having seen this article shared by several other friends and in at least one other discussion group.



    Hobbes' question is simple: Why, despite significant legal progress in the past decades, are the lives of young gay men (probably generalizable to young queer men) still marked by so many signs of trauma?

    [T]he rates of depression, loneliness and substance abuse in the gay community remain stuck in the same place they’ve been for decades. Gay people are now, depending on the study, between 2 and 10 times more likely than straight people to take their own lives. We’re twice as likely to have a major depressive episode. And just like the last epidemic we lived through, the trauma appears to be concentrated among men. In a survey of gay men who recently arrived in New York City, three-quarters suffered from anxiety or depression, abused drugs or alcohol or were having risky sex—or some combination of the three. Despite all the talk of our “chosen families,” gay men have fewer close friends than straight people or gay women. In a survey of care-providers at HIV clinics, one respondent told researchers: “It’s not a question of them not knowing how to save their lives. It’s a question of them knowing if their lives are worth saving.”

    I’m not going to pretend to be objective about any of this. I’m a perpetually single gay guy who was raised in a bright blue city by PFLAG parents. I’ve never known anyone who died of AIDS, I’ve never experienced direct discrimination and I came out of the closet into a world where marriage, a picket fence and a golden retriever were not just feasible, but expected. I’ve also been in and out of therapy more times than I’ve downloaded and deleted Grindr.

    “Marriage equality and the changes in legal status were an improvement for some gay men,” says Christopher Stults, a researcher at New York University who studies the differences in mental health between gay and straight men. “But for a lot of other people, it was a letdown. Like, we have this legal status, and yet there’s still something unfulfilled.”

    This feeling of emptiness, it turns out, is not just an American phenomenon. In the Netherlands, where gay marriage has been legal since 2001, gay men remain three times more likely to suffer from a mood disorder than straight men, and 10 times more likely to engage in “suicidal self-harm.” In Sweden, which has had civil unions since 1995 and full marriage since 2009, men married to men have triple the suicide rate of men married to women.

    All of these unbearable statistics lead to the same conclusion: It is still dangerously alienating to go through life as a man attracted to other men. The good news, though, is that epidemiologists and social scientists are closer than ever to understanding all the reasons why.


    Hobbes' answer, that young people are traumatized firstly by the stresses of growing up in the closet in often very difficult circumstances then by entering a gay community that insensitively allows the imposition of new restrictions and rules, all without much recognition of these psychological shocks never mind treatment of said, is one that convinces me. I have say that I think I recognize some of the symptoms in my own life, certainly in the sort of cultivation of emotional distance from any potential stressors Hobbes describes towards the end.

    What do you think? Have you read this article? What are your opinions on the issues it describes?
    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • James Bow calls for an end to the US-Canada Safe Third Country agreement prohibiting people coming from American soil from claiming refugee status in Canada.

    • D-Brief reports on the vast array of man-made minerals appearing in what is now being called the Anthropocene Era of Earth.

    • Dangerous Minds notes the efforts of the Disco Preservation Society to preserve DJ mixes from 1980s San Francisco.

    • Language Log takes issue with Neil DeGrasse Tyson's argument that cryptographers, not linguists, would be needed in Arrival.

    • The LRB Blog notes impunity for murderers of civil society activists in Honduras.

    • Marginal Revolution's Tyler Cowen talks about Joyce Gladwell's autobiography Brown Face, Big Master.

    • The NYRB Daily celebrates the work of Hercules Segers.

    • The Planetary Society Blog is skeptical of the Space X plan to send tourists past the Moon by 2018.

    • Supernova Condensate lists 8 things we know about Proxima Centauri b.

    • Towleroad reports on new walking tours being offered of gay London.

    • Arnold Zwicky engages with a California exhibition comparing paintings with movies.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • Antipope's Charlie Stross wonders if the politics of Trump might mean an end to the British nuclear deterrent.

    • Centauri Dreams shares Andrew LePage's evaluation of the TRAPPIST-1 system, where he concludes that there are in fact three plausible candidates for habitable status there.

    • Dangerous Minds shares the gender-bending photographs of Norwegian photographers Marie Høeg and Bolette Berg.

    • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the 1980s HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States.

    • The Extremo Files looks at the human microbiome.

    • Language Hat links to an article on Dakhani, a south Indian Urdu dialect.

    • The LRB Blog looks at policing in London.

    • The Map Room Blog notes that 90% of the hundred thousand lakes of Manitoba are officially unnamed.

    • Marginal Revolution looks at the remarkable Akshardham Temple of New Delhi.

    • The Planetary Society Blog notes how citizen scientists detected changes in Rosetta's comet.

    • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer provides a visual guide for New Yorkers at the size of the proposed border wall.

    • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper taking a look at the history of abortion in 20th century France.

    • Torontoist looks at the 1840s influx of Irish refugees to Toronto.

    • Understanding Society takes a look at the research that went into the discovery of the nucleus of the atom.

    • Window on Eurasia reports on Belarus.

    • Arnold Zwicky shares photos and commentary on the stars and plot of Oscar-winning film Midnight.

    rfmcdonald: (Default)

    • Centauri Dreams looks at the SPECULOOS red dwarf observation program.

    • The Crux examines VX nerve agent, the chemical apparently used to assassinate the half-brother of North Korea's ruler.

    • Dangerous Minds shares photos of the inhabitants of the Tokyo night, like gangsters and prostitutes and drag queens.

    • Lawyers, Guns and Money examines Donald Trump's tepid and belated denunciation of anti-Semitism.

    • Language Log looks at the story of the Wenzhounese, a Chinese group notable for its diaspora in Italy.

    • The LRB Blog looks at the by-elections in the British ridings of Stoke and Copeland and notes the problems of labour.

    • The Map Room Blog shares a post-Brexit map of the European Union with an independent Scotland.

    • Marginal Revolution reports that a border tax would be a poor idea for the United States and Mexico.

    • The NYRB Daily looks at the art of the medieval Tibetan kingdom of Guge.

    • Otto Pohl notes the 73rd anniversary of Stalin's deportation of the Chechens and the Ingush.

    • Supernova Condensate points out that Venus is actually the most Earth-like planet we know of. Why do we not explore it more?

    • Towleroad notes Depeche Mode's denunciation of the alt-right and Richard Spencer.

    • Whatever's John Scalzi considers the question of feeling empathy for horrible people.

    • Window on Eurasia notes the thousands of Russian citizens involved with ISIS and examines the militarization of Kaliningrad.

    Profile

    rfmcdonald: (Default)rfmcdonald

    June 2017

    S M T W T F S
         1 2 3
    4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    11 12 13 14 15 1617
    1819 20 21 22 2324
    252627282930 

    Syndicate

    RSS Atom

    Style Credit

    Expand Cut Tags

    No cut tags
    Page generated Jun. 24th, 2017 08:50 am
    Powered by Dreamwidth Studios