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  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly writes about the pleasures of the unmediated life, experienced in her recent vacation.

  • This celebration at Centauri Dreams of the forty years of science from the Voyager missions is heart-warming.

  • White racism in power is touched upon at Lawyers, Guns and Money.

  • Noel Maurer notes that the Philippines, where indiscriminate violence is state policy, no longer counts as a true democracy. Duturte as Marcos?

  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map depicting the frequency with which young adults live with parents across Europe. Northwestern Europe stands out.

  • Understanding Society looks at an early critique of positivism in sociology.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at Belarus' preparation for the Zapad 2017 military exercises with Russia.

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  • Charley Ross reports on an unexpected personal involvement in the disappearance of Kori Gossett. Did an informant know?

  • Citizen Science Salon reports, in the time of #sharkweek, on the sevengill sharks.

  • The Dragon's Tales links to an article on the Chinese base in Sudan.

  • Inkfish has a fascinating article describing how New Zealand's giant black swans went extinct, and were replaced.

  • Language Hat notes two obscure words of Senegalese French, "laptot" and "signare". What do they mean? Go see.

  • Language Log argues that the influx of English loanwords in Chinese is remarkable. Does it signal future changes in language?

  • Lawyers, Guns Money notes how Los Angeles and southern California were, during the American Civil War, a stronghold of secessionist sentiment, and runs down some of the problems of Mexico, including the militarization of crime.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on what books by which authors tend to get stolen from British bookstores.
  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer suggests that Donald Trump is not likely to be able to substantially reshape NAFTA.

  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the recent protests in Poland against changes to the Supreme Court.

  • Understanding Society takes a look at the structure of the cities of medieval Europe, which apparently were dynamic and flexible.

  • Unicorn Booty shares some classic gay board games.

  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is going to try to wage a repeat of the Winter War on Ukraine.

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  • MacLean's Joe Castaldo notes the case for Sears Canada giving executives retention bonuses even as it shorts lesser workers.

  • CBC notes another, potentially more successful, search for Avro Arrow models in the depths of Lake Ontario.

  • VICE notes the history of white supremacism in Canada, extending to the point of a failed coup by some in Dominica.

  • Spacing reports on the Indigenous Place Making Council, intended to secure a place for increasingly urban First Nations in Canada.

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  • Sandy Garossino considers the furor over Omar Khadr. What if the 15 year old was actually not guilty of the crimes of which he was accused?

  • The Globe and Mail's Tabatha Southey points out, after the Proud Boys incident in Halifax, how the alt-right's claims to be joking reveals their intent. Hannah Arendt knew these kinds of people.

  • The CBC's Haydn Watters describes how one Ottawa couple is planning to visit in 2018 every location involved in every one of the 87 Heritage Minutes.

  • Ben Paynter at Fast Company writes about the system of funding and other support that keeps Canadian pop music thriving.

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  • Crooked Timber links the near-criminal destruction of Grenfell Tower with Thatcherism's deregulations and catastrophes.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes that TRAPPIST-1e is slated to be among the first observational targets of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  • Far Outliers shares Edith Durham's account of an exciting St. John's Day in Albania in 1908.

  • Language Hat looks at a passage from Turgenev.

  • What, the LRB wonders, will Emmanuel Macron do with his crushing victory after the parliamentary elections, too?

  • Marginal Revolution wonders to what extent is Germany's support for Nord Stream consistent with Germany's concerns over NATO and Russia.

  • Ed Jackson's Spacing Toronto article about the need to preserve queer public history in Toronto is a must-read.
  • Torontoist's Alex Yerman notes the new activity of the Jewish left against a conservative establishment.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests that modern Russia is repeating the Soviet Union's overmilitarization mistakes, only this time with fewer resources.

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  • AIDS Action Now veteran Tim McCaskell argues in NOW Toronto that the new gay activism reflects the growing diversity of the community, riven by race and income.

  • Steven W. Thrasher argues from a radical position against the presence of police and militarism generally in American Pride marches.

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  • Anthony Easton at MacLean's writes in defense of Nickelback, one of Canada's most popular bands if not a critical darling.

  • Also in MacLean's, Stephanie Carvin notes that the new foreign and military policies announced by the Canadian government could still fall short.

  • Bloomberg View's Stephen L. Carter considers the idea of the just war through the lens of Wonder Woman.

  • Nuclear energy, it seems, will be India's answer to global warming in the era of Trump.

  • Qataris, Bloomberg notes, are trying to deal with their island country's state of siege.

  • Airbus may pull its production plants from the United Kingdom unless the country keeps single market access.

  • Refugees, Lynne Olson notes at National Geographic, helped save the United Kingdom during the Second World War.

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  • blogTO looks at deserted Mirvish Village.

  • Crooked Timber reenages with the Rachel Carson and DDT myth.

  • The Crux looks at the Mandela Effect, exploring false memories.

  • Dangerous Minds makes the case for the musical genius of Bobbie Gentry.

  • From the Heart of Europe's Nicholas Whyte recounts his visit to Albania's bunker museum.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes Brazil's retirement of its only aircraft carrier.

  • The LRB Blog looks at the extent and speed of events in the Trump Administration.

  • Marginal Revolution engages with a book examining France's carving out a "cultural exception" in international trade agreements.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw reports on the passing of rulership of the Australian micronation of Hutt River.

  • Peter Rukavina shares good advice for visiting museums: visit only what you can take in.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russian Orthodox Church opposition to a certain kind of Russian civic nationality, and argues Russia is losing even its regional superpower status.

  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell reports on how local councils in the United Kingdom are speculating on commercial property.

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Business Insider's Christopher Woody reports on what sounds like a disastrous first phone call between Trump and Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, filled with insults and threats up to and including a threat to invade Mexico. I would hope that someone around Trump would prevent him from going nearly so far, but I fear that some people around him would want something catastrophic to happen to US-Mexican relations for their own purposes.

During a phone call with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto on Friday, US President Donald Trump disparaged Mexico and threatened to use military force against the drug trade, according to Dolia Estevez, a journalist based in Washington, DC.

In an interview with the Mexican news outlet Aristegui Noticias, Estevez, who cited sources on both sides of the call, said, "It was a very offensive conversation where Trump humiliated Peña Nieto."

[. . .]

"I don't need the Mexicans. I don't need Mexico," Trump reportedly told the Mexican president. "We are going to build the wall and you all are going to pay for it, like it or not."

Trump hinted that the US would force Mexico to fund the wall with a 10% tax on Mexican exports "and of 35% on those exports that hurt Mexico the most," Estevez wrote in Proyecto Puente.

Before the call, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Trump was considering a tax on imports from Mexico to pay for the wall.

[. . .]

Trump "even suggested to [Peña Nieto] that if they are incapable of combatting [narco trafficking] he may have to send troops to assume this task," she said.
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  • blogTO notes that Uniqlo will be giving away free thermal clothing tomorrow.

  • James Bow shares his column about the importance of truth.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly shares with us her mid-winter walk.

  • Centauri Dreams reports about cometary water.

  • Dangerous Minds shares German cinema lobby cards from the 1960s.

  • Language Hat talks about dropping apostrophes.

  • Language Log reports about lexical searches on Google.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the latest from Trump.

  • The NYRB Daily shares a review of an Iranian film on gender relations.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer notes the ongoing gas price protests in Mexico.

  • Spacing links to some articles about affordable housing around the world.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes Germany's abolition of a law forbidding insults to foreign heads of state.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests that stable Russian population figures cover up a wholesale collapse in the numbers of ethnic Russians, and looks at the shortages of skilled workers faced by defense industries.

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  • Beyond the Beyond links to a US military science fiction contest.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly notes that journalism is meant to offer criticisms of the president.

  • Crooked Timber has an open forum about the inauguration.

  • Dangerous Minds shares photos from seminal 1980-era London club Billy's.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper reporting on a superflare on brown dwarf EPIC 220186653.

  • A Fistful of Euros' features Doug Merrill's meditations on 2009 and 2017.

  • Language Log looks at the etymology of the Vietnamese name "Nguyen."

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at Donald Trump's desire for a military parade.

  • The LRB Blog looks at Donald Trump as a winner.

  • Marginal Revolution links to a book on the economics of skyscrapers and notes a skyscraper boom in China.

  • Steve Munro looks at buses and their distribution on TTC networks.

  • Transit Toronto looks at how Exhibition Place work will complicate multiple bus routes.

  • Window on Eurasia notes low levels of Russian productivity, shares a Russian argument as to why Russia and the United States can never be allies in the long term, looks at counterproductive Russian interference in Circassian diaspora institutions, and shares argument suggesting Trump's style of language explains why he wants to forego complicated multilateral negotiations for bilateral ones where he can dominate.

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The National Post carried Mike Blanchfield's Canadian Press article reporting that, if Trump lived up to his rhetoric and did withdraw from NATO, Canada will have to increase its spending and its presence significantly. Canada's development into a larger military power would certainly be a major shift.

Canada will have to contribute more to NATO if the U.S. follows through on president-elect Donald Trump’s musings on withdrawing from the alliance, says the head of the House of Commons foreign affairs committee.

Liberal MP Bob Nault cautions that Canada and its NATO partners need to see how U.S. foreign policy formally takes shape after Trump’s Friday inauguration.

But he says Canada remains committed to the 28-country alliance and can’t let it become weakened if the U.S. — its largest financial and military contributor — scales back its involvement.

“That means countries like ours will have to step up to the plate,” Nault said in an interview Monday.

Nault said the upcoming defence policy review will help Canada decide where and how it should deploy its military resources. With a federal budget coming this winter that could mean an increase in defence spending, he added.
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  • blogTO shares photos of Toronto streets in the 1960s, cluttered by signage.

  • Crooked Timber and the LRB Blog respond to the death of Fidel Castro.

  • Far Outliers looks at the exploitative but functional British treatment of servants.

  • Language Hat notes the insensitivity of machine translation and examines the evolution of the Spanish language.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money advocates for an energized public response to racist displays in Trump's America.

  • The Map Room Blog looks at a controversial Brexit art exhibition.

  • Marginal Revolution notes a pay by the minute coffee shop in Brooklyn.

  • The NYRB Daily shares images of Hokusai.

  • The Planetary Society Blog shares beautiful space photos.

  • Window on Eurasia notes how terror famines were used to russify peripheral areas of the Soviet Union, reports on strengthening religion among younger Daghestanis, and suggests there will be larger Russian deployments in Belarus.

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Torontoist's David Wencer describes how Sunnybrook Military Hospital came to be.

In 1928, the City of Toronto received an enormous gift: Sunnybrook Farm. The farm was a reported 70 hectares of mostly undeveloped land located just north of the city limits, stretching from Bayview to Leslie across a picturesque section of the Don River. The donor was Alice Kilgour, and Sunnybrook Farm represented part of the estate on which she had lived with her husband, Joseph, until his death a few years earlier. Alice Kilgour’s gift was conditional on the City maintaining the property as a park and opening it to the public for recreation. “In order to give the citizens the fullest enjoyment of the park,” she wrote, “it should, I think, be definitely understood that none of the roads in it be used as public thoroughfares for public conveyances or commercial traffic.” “It will make one of the finest parks the city has,” predicted Board of Control member and future Toronto mayor Bert Wemp in the Globe. “The scenery up the Don Valley is wonderful, and it will be a grand place for the children.”

Over the next decade, Sunnybrook Park became a popular destination for Torontonians. It was located relatively close to the city limits, but far enough away from the bustle of downtown to serve as a relaxing getaway. Through the 1930s, it was the scene of sporting events, picnics, botanical study, and the activities of many local clubs and organizations. In 1931, the Toronto Field Naturalists financed guided tours of Sunnybrook Park, supplied three days a week by Mr. L. T. Owens, whom the Globe reported was “ready to conduct [the public] through the park and reveal the secrets of nature.”

Toronto’s relationship with the property took a dramatically different turn, however, following the outbreak of the Second World War.

At the start of the war, Toronto’s primary veterans’s hospital was the Christie Street Hospital, located on Christie between Dupont and Davenport, in what was then still an industrial neighbourhood. The hospital was housed in an old cash register factory which had been re-purposed in 1919 was the city’s primary hospital for the care of veterans not just of the First World War, but also of other conflicts, including the Boer War.

When large numbers of wounded veterans began returning to Toronto during the 1940s, it became apparent that the facilities at Christie Street were woefully inadequate. The hospital was uncomfortably close to a busy rail corridor. Passing trains reportedly caused the building to vibrate, and spewed smoke into the hospital hallways. One Globe and Mail article noted that freshly laundered hospital linen had, by the end of the day, accumulated a layer of dust and dirt. In her 2014 book The History of Sunnybrook Hospital: Battle to Greatness, Francesca Grosso cites one example of a Christie Street doctor complaining that the noise prevented him from being able to hear the heartbeats of his patients. While the building had been scarcely suitable for use as a hospital at the time of its opening, years of neglect had caused it to fall into a state of disrepair.
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  • Antipope shares a guest essay by an author pointing out how duelling was a social plague.

  • 'Nathan Smith's Apostrophen shares an essay noting that being a Donald Trump supporter who reads gay romance is a contradiction.

  • Beyond the Beyond notes new European Union interest in defense integration.

  • blogTO reports that a Torontonian designed the new Starbucks holiday cup.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly wonders how much our parents shape us.

  • D-Brief looks at Semantic Scholar, an AI tool for scholars.

  • The Dragon's Tales reports on methane humidity near Titan's surface and an active drainage system.

  • Joe. My. God. notes the interest of Florida attorney-general Pam Bondi at the interest of serving in the administration of Donald Trump.

  • Language Hat shares a lovely poem translated from the Russian.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the upsurge in hate crimes post-election in the United States.

  • The LRB Blog shares one man's memories of Leonard Cohen.

  • Marginal Revolution notes the problems of Saudi Arabia.

  • The NYRB Daily notes the largely negative effect of the Internet, and social media, on the election.

  • Savage Minds notes how anthropology teachers can teach the Trump election.

  • Towleroad shares RuPaul's horror at the election.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy argues the Gary Johnson candidacy helped Hillary, though by not enough.

  • Window on Eurasia argues that a state ideology would make Russia totalitarian.

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Looking at the history of Island aviation #pei #charlottetown #charlottetownairport #aviation #history #latergram


Charlottetown Airport has, by the departures, a little display depicting the more than one hundred years of aviation history.

The Prince Edward Island government had a great essay describing the history of the airport in detail, but this has been removed by a site reorganization. (See below the fold for the text.)

Read more... )
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  • blogTO shares the new face of the Broadview Hotel.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly writes about the joys of the unscreened life.

  • Dead Things reports on a study suggesting that although humans are violent by the standards of mammals, we are among the least violent primates.

  • The Dragon's Gaze reports on the discovery of five sizable planets orbiting HIP 41378.

  • Language Log reports on the perils of 7 and 9 in Cantonese.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the usefulness of The Battle of Algiers.

  • The Planetary Society Blog reacts to the Elon Musk proposal for colonizing Mars.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer responds briefly to the question of what Mexico can do about Trump.

  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian invasion of Ukraine has spurred new arms purchases throughout the eastern half of Europe, even in Belarus.

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Lamppost beneath the Prince Edward Battery #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #lamppost #latergram


Below the Prince Edward Battery lies a boardwalk that runs the length of Victoria Park's coastline. When you look up, you can just see the Canadian flag that flies above, and one of the wood-lined ports for the cannons.
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In January of 2014, I shared photos from Prince Edward Battery. Now located roughly in the middle of Charlottetown's Victoria Park, it had been for most of the 19th century Charlottetown's military outpost guarding the harbour against intruders. The departure of British forces from the Island led to the site's incorporation into Charlottetown's main park in 1905 upon the departure of British forces from Prince Edward Island. This military outpost that never saw a battle is a restful place to wander.

Towards the Prince Edward Battery #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram


Towards the gate #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram


The cannons #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram #cannon


Plaque #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram


Cannonry #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram #cannon


Aimed #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram #cannon #charlottetownharbour


Blockhouse #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram


Harbour below #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram #charlottetownharbour


From the west #pei #charlottetown #victoriapark #princeedwardbattery #latergram #skyline
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  • Centauri Dreams considers Juno's photos of Jupiter's poles.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes the discovery of another star that behaves much like mysterious Tabby's Star.

  • Far Outliers reports on the good reputation of the Chinese forces at Shanghai in 1937.

  • Joe. My. God. notes a Christian site that claims gay sex is not sex.

  • Language Hat reports on the problems of translating Elena Ferrante.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money and Noel Maurer are unimpressed by Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson.

  • The New APPS Blog writes against faculty lock-outs.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw describes the Parers, a Catalan-Australian family.

  • Window on Eurasia notes Ukraine's recognition of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, reports on how Russians resent Ukrainian refugees, and suggests the Russian economic crisis is finally hitting Moscow and St. Petersburg.

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