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  • blogTO notes that the Toronto Reference Library will be holding a huge sale again next week.

  • Inside Toronto profiles Sephora Hussein, new collection head of the Merril Collection.

  • Michael Lyons writes about the importance of the newly-reopened Hanlan's beach on the Toronto Islands.

  • Jake Tobin Garrett argues at Torontoist for the importance of the proposed Rail Deck Park.

  • Emily Macrae argues at Torontoist there is much Toronto can learn from the green--literally--laneways of Montréal.

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  • CBC Montreal notes how Andrée Archambault has been leaving books on the Montréal Metro for commuters to find.

  • CBC's Jonathan Ore notes the (perhaps surprisingly) innovative Transformers comics put out by IDW.

  • At The Conversation, Una McCormack writes about how the 13th Doctor being played by Jodie Whittaker fulfills her childhood dreams.

  • At The Globe and Mail, Russell Smith examines why the alt-right hates cultural experimentation and innovation so much.

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The tracks of Bonaventure


Montréal's subway stations, like Bonaventure, are at their best gorgeous public spaces full of art and light. Even at their more pedestrian, they show a good sense for design that I wish was more common on Toronto's different routes.
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The Lipstick Forest, Claude Cormier


This installation on the ground floor of the Palais des congrès is eyecatching.
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Maisonneuve Monument, at night


The Maisonneuve Monument, erected in honour of Montréal's founder Paul Chomedey de Maisonneuve, stands squarely at the heart of the Place d'Armes.
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The Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal is a huge edifice towering over its neighbourhood. I had seen it looming over Vieux-Montréal, but it was only when I tried to take a photo of the entire building that I realized its size. I had to back up to the far side of the Place d'Armes just for a single shot of the entire building in my viewfinder.

Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal (1)


Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal (2)


Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal (3)


Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal (4)


Basilique Notre-Dame de Montréal (5)
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By the time that I had finally gotten down to the Saint Lawrence in the Vieux-Port, to the west of Pointe-à-Callière, it had stopped being twilight and started to become night. Some of the better photos that I took there look to me almost like Impressionist paintings. I could see Habitat 67 across the way, and was particularly taken by grain silo no. 5.

Ice on the Saint Lawrence


Looking west (1)


Looking west (2)


Looking across at Habitat 67 (1)


Looking across at Habitat 67 (2)


Looking across at Habitat 67 (3)


Élévateur à grain no. 5 (1)


Élévateur à grain no. 5 (2)
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I did not get to see the renowned Pointe-à-Callière Museum on this visit. I did get to spend time there in the twilight, wandering around there and the adjacent Place Royale down by the Saint Lawrence.

Around Pointe-à-Callière, looking west (portrait)

Around Pointe-à-Callière, looking west (landscape)


Place Royale (portrait)


Place Royale (landscape)


Around Pointe-à-Callière, looking east
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Hotel Nelligan, 106 rue Saint-Paul ouest


Wandering Vieux-Montréal in the emerging evening light, I wandered past Hotel Nelligan, an establishment named after the great poet Émile Nelligan.
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Celebrating Montreal 375 at City Hall


These golden doors of the Hôtel de Ville were framed by these banners advertising Montreal 375, this year's celebration of the 375th anniversary of Montréal's foundation.
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Nelson's Column stands just to the west of Montréal's Second Empire Hôtel de Ville. The two constructions, one slim and tall and the other much the larger, made a eye-catching pair for me.

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Un tire d'érable, $C 3


At a stand set up for Igloofest on Place Jacques-Cartier, below Montréal's Hôtel de Ville, I bought some maple taffy for $C 3. The heated maple syrup cooled very quickly once it was poured onto the ice, quickly becoming edible.
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MacLean's carries Alexandra Posadzki's Canadian Press article looking at how high housing prices are driving Canadians out of major cities for markets with lower prices.

Julien Simon and his wife were living happily in their condo in the Vancouver suburb of Burnaby when life intervened last year in the form of a baby on the way.

The couple — he’s an Internet marketer, she’s an environmental engineer — couldn’t see themselves living in a shoebox crammed full of baby stuff, so they pulled up stakes, put their condo up for sale and moved about four hours away to Kamloops, B.C., where they bought a four-bedroom house for nearly the same price.

“In Vancouver, this house would be in the $2 million range,” says Simon, who works from home while his wife now works for the government as a flood safety engineer.

While more detailed profiles will emerge in subsequent releases, the 2016 census data released Wednesday found that there were more than 14 million occupied private dwellings in Canada, a 5.6 per cent increase over the five-year period that ended in 2011. That growth rate, however, was significantly lower than the 7.1 per cent rate recorded five years ago.

Thanks in large part to a commensurate spike in population that was the largest in Canada, Nunavut reported the fastest dwellings growth at 13.4 per cent, followed by Alberta (9.9 per cent), Yukon (7.8 per cent) and British Columbia (6.6 per cent).

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