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  • The National Park Service's LGBTQ Heritage Theme Study is an amazingly thorough survey of sites and stories of note.

  • In The Globe and Mail, Stephanie Chambers explores how the history of homophobia recorded in her newspaper's old articles.

  • Back2Stonewall shares rare archival footage of the 1970 Christopher Street Liberation Day parade, ancestor of Pride.

  • The New Yorker's Daniel Penny tells the story of Joseph Touchette, at 93 the oldest drag queen in Greenwich Village.

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  • Joe. My. God. has reposted a famous, fantastic contemporary New York Daily News article about the Stonewall Riots.

  • James Leahy's clips of Toronto Pride parades from 1988 through 1995 are great. h/t to Leahy and to Shawn Micallef of Spacing for sharing them.

  • Arnold Zwicky has collated some photos of Pride rainbows on Chicago and Dublin transit buses and on some boots.

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  • The Globe and Mail's Joanna Slater talks about how the subway system of New York City is staggering from catastrophe to catastrophe.

  • The Globe and Mail's Stephen Quinn argues it is much too late to save Vancouver's Chinatown from radical redevelopment.

  • The Toronto Star's Tess Kalinowski writes about how young buyers are driving a push for laneway housing in Toronto.
  • Bryan Tucker, also in the Toronto Star, also makes the case for laneway housing.

  • The National Post shares a story about an affordable 18th century house on the Québec-Vermont border.

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  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly photoblogs about her trip to Berlin.

  • Dead Things reports on a recent study that unraveled the evolutionary history of the domestic cat.

  • James Nicoll notes that his niece and nephew will each be performing theatre in Toronto.

  • Language Hat has an interesting link to interviews of coders as if they were translators.

  • Marginal Revolution looks at Chinese video game competitions and Chinese tours to Soviet revolutionary sites.

  • Steve Munro shares photos of the old Kitchener trolleybus.

  • Roads and Kingdoms shares the story of the Ramadan drummer of Coney Island.

  • Savage Minds shares an essay arguing that photographers should get their subjects' consent and receive renumeration.

  • Torontoist shares photos of the Trans March.

  • Towleroad
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  • The New York Times' Michael Wilson tells the sad story of how a woman murdered in Harlem was only identified 47 years later.

  • In NOW Toronto, Gelek Badheytsang writes about the complexities surrounding the visit of the 17th Karmapa to Tibetan-heavy Parkdale.

  • Novak Jankovic writes in MacLean's that there are real declines in the Toronto real estate market, but not enough to set a trend.

  • The Toronto Star's Jackie Hong reports that protecting Bluffer's Park from the waves of Lake Ontario could also wreck an east-end surfing haunt.

  • The National Post reports on how the Ontario NDP claims, probably correctly, that the Wynne Liberals are stealing their ideas. Good for them, I say.

  • Universe Today's Matt Williams notes a study reporting that life on Mars' surface is a much greater risk factor for cancer than previously thought.

  • Seth Miller argues that efficient electric cars will push Big Oil through the trauma of Big Coal in the 2020s.

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In a great Wired article, Charley Locke describes how a photo taken on the New York City subway system by Instagram user subwaycreatures ended up going hilariously viral.

Samuel Themer never planned to be a symbol of everything that’s right or wrong with America. He just wanted to go to work. But when he hopped on the subway to head into Manhattan on February 19, the Queens resident was in full drag—he performs as Gilda Wabbit. He also ended up sitting next to a woman in a niqab, a fact he initially didn’t even notice. “I was just sitting on the train, existing,” he says. “It didn’t seem out of the ordinary that a woman in full modesty garb would sit next to me.”

Someone on that W car with them, though, thought otherwise. Boubah Barry, a Guinean immigrant and real estate student, wanted to document what he saw as a testament to tolerance, so he took a photo of the pair and posted it to Instagram. “It’s diversity,” says Barry, who says he doesn’t identify as liberal or conservative but does oppose President Trump’s refugee ban. “They sit next to each other, and no one cares.”

But someone did care. After the post was shared by Instagram account subwaycreatures, the photo drifted across the internet until /pol/ News Network attached it to a tweet on Wednesday with the message “This is the future that liberals want.”

/pol/ News Network, which also recently declared Get Out to be anti-white propaganda, probably intended the post to be a warning about the impending liberal dystopia. But as soon as actual liberals saw it, they flipped the message on its head—and began touting the message as exactly the future they wanted. They filled /pol/ News Network’s mentions with messages endorsing the photo and adding their own visions of a bright future. By Thursday, it was a full-blown meme. Soon images of a future filled with interspecies companionship, gay space communism, and Garfield flooded onto social media.
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  • blogTO reports on how a trespasser at track level disrupted subway service today.

  • Crooked Timber argues Trump's migration ban is best under stood as an elaboration of existing Western immigration policies, taking them to their logical conclusion.

  • Dangerous Minds looks at 1980s New York City industrial rockers Missing Foundation.

  • The Dragon's Gaze examines the orbit of Proxima Centauri around the A-B pair.

  • The Everyday Sociology Blog profiles four millennial students to attack the idea of their generation as lazy.

  • Language Log and Strange Maps look at how the list of countries whose citizens are banned from the US does not map onto the list of countries which have provided terrorists who have attacked the United States.

  • The LRB BLog looks at the first ten days of the Trump Administration.

  • The NYRB Daily looks at the scale of the popular mobilization against Trump.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer looks at how modest immigration controls in Argentina are overshadowed by the US.

  • Transit Toronto reports on streetcar line repair on Queen Street.

  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Trump will allow Russia to do as it will in most of the former Soviet Union, and <a href="http://windowoneurasia2.blogspot.ca/2017/01/moscow-now-taking-seriously-that-russia.html'><U>looks</u></a> at the prospect Russia might lose out in international sporting events.</li> </ul>
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  • Bad Astronomy shares a photo of the Earth and Moon taken by a Mars probe.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money responds to a baffling claim by a New York City policeman that stranger rape is more of a concern than acquaintance rape.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw, returned from Denmark, wonders
    about the extent to which social happiness is maximized by stability and security.

  • Progressive Download's John Farrell argues that scientists should approach the theory of evolution in a less mechanistic light.

  • Window on Eurasia reports on the transformation of United Russia into a parallel structure of government akin to the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, and engages with the possibility of a pro-Russian Ukrainian government-in-exile.

  • Alex Harrowell of Yorkshire Ranter looks at the problems of an independent central bank, finding that failings attributed to these are actually faults of government.

  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the highly evolved fashion sense of faggots, in the context of Italy's divides and celebrities.

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Unicorn Booty associate editor Alexander Kacala has a nice interview with the real-life gay couples whose image was used in a mural in a station in New York City's new Second Avenue subway.

After taking nearly a century to build, the Second Avenue subway extension in Manhattan opened on Sunday with lots of pomp and circumstance. Three new stations opened at 72nd, 86th and 96th Streets. It’s not really a whole new line, just an extension of the Q line, which now runs from the Upper East Side to Coney Island.

The 96th Street Station is especially bougie. One of the things making it extra fabulous is a captivating mural by Vik Muniz. “Over three dozen mosaic portraits depicting everyday New Yorkers waiting for a train adorn the walls of the new line,” Buzzfeed writes.

One of those portraits is of married couple Thor Stockman and Patrick Kellogg.

The couple is particularly proud of their participation in the project because they don’t feel represented in popular culture. “Our friends were happy that this is gay representation on the walls of New York City, but our friends were even happier that this is gay representation that is not incredibly beautiful and skinny,” Kellogg tells The New York Post.

We reached out to Stockman and Kellogg ourselves to find out some answers to our own questions. Here is what they told us about the whole experience of being immortalized on the walls of New York’s subway—including the haters, why they haven’t seen it yet and what they hope is next.
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The Toronto Star carries Jake Pearson's Associated Press article noting how New York City's Second Avenue subway line is nearing a deadline. Will it meet it? We'll see.

New Yorkers have become accustomed to waiting on the subway. But nearly 45 years?

That’s how long it’s been since construction began on a much-needed subway line beneath the east side of Manhattan. And if history is any guide, it’s anybody’s guess whether a Dec. 31 deadline to open it will actually be met.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has been pushing the end-of-the-year deadline set by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) hard in recent days, saying it’s become about more than the long-delayed Second Avenue subway — it’s about the faith people have in government.

“Nobody believes it’s going to be done on time, nobody,” the Democratic governor said in a radio interview this week. But, he added, “If we can get it done on time … if we can open that thing up at the beginning of the year, maybe people will start to say once again, “Wow. Maybe we can do something.”

The Second Avenue subway, seen as crucial to alleviating traffic on one of the world’s busiest transit systems, has been star-crossed since it was first envisioned by the city’s transportation board in 1929. Those plans were derailed by the stock market crash a few months later.
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I thought I'll tonight repost my post of the 11th of June, 2012, resharing the photos I took that day of the Strawberry Fields memorial to John Lennon in New York City's Central Park.

* * *

I certainly wasn't the only person visiting Strawberry Fields earlier this afternoon, a section of Central Park adjacent to West 72nd Street that was landscaped as a memorial to John Lennon. The central focus of the area is a circular mosaic, inlaid with the word "Imagine" at the centre and surrounded by offerings and people genuflecting, like the woman wearing a Doctor Who T-shirt in the first photo below, or--unphotographed--like me.

Strawberry Fields (1)

Strawberry Fields (2)

Strawberry Fields (3)

Strawberry Fields (4)
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  • blogTO shares photos of Toronto streets in the 1960s, cluttered by signage.

  • Crooked Timber and the LRB Blog respond to the death of Fidel Castro.

  • Far Outliers looks at the exploitative but functional British treatment of servants.

  • Language Hat notes the insensitivity of machine translation and examines the evolution of the Spanish language.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money advocates for an energized public response to racist displays in Trump's America.

  • The Map Room Blog looks at a controversial Brexit art exhibition.

  • Marginal Revolution notes a pay by the minute coffee shop in Brooklyn.

  • The NYRB Daily shares images of Hokusai.

  • The Planetary Society Blog shares beautiful space photos.

  • Window on Eurasia notes how terror famines were used to russify peripheral areas of the Soviet Union, reports on strengthening religion among younger Daghestanis, and suggests there will be larger Russian deployments in Belarus.

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  • blogTO notes city opposition to a new subdivision in Weston.

  • The Dragon's Gaze reports on KIC 7917485b, a massive gas giant found in close orbit of a star.

  • The Everyday Sociology Blog dissects the idea of this being a season of giving.

  • Joe. My. God. notes Clinton's vote lead over Trump surpassed two million.

  • Language Log looks at Chinese transcriptions of Donald Trump's name.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money remembers Scott Eric Kaufmann.

  • The LRB Blog reports on the protests outside of Trump Tower.

  • Savage Minds considers the relationship of anthropology to racist founders.

  • Torontoist looks at new plans for Old City Hall.

  • Transit Toronto reports on holiday trains delivering goods to food banks.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at how Uzbekistan has been settling disputes with its neighbours.

  • Arnold Zwicky reports on gardens and nature art from California.

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  • blogTO shares some photos of Toronto in colour from the 1950s.

  • Centauri Dreams talks about SETI in the light of the Anthropocene era.

  • Dangerous Minds notes that there is now a hipster nativity scene available for purchase.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper suggesting that tidal heating could explain the difference between super-Earths and mini-Neptunes.

  • Joe. My. God. notes that protecting Trump in New York City costs that municipality a million dollars a day, and notes a parade of Spanish fascists in support of Trump.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that politics is identity politics.
  • The LRB Blog notes the end of Sarkozy's campaign and revisits Goldwater.

  • The Russian Demographics Blog reports on the latest about the population of Ukraine.

  • Towleroad notes the hateful mail received by an out mayor in Massachusetts.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at Trump's apparently anti-constitutional entanglement of business and politics.

  • Window on Eurasia reports on how Russia's promotion of the Russian language in neighbouring countries is backfiring, and looks at the hard nationalist line of Patriarch Kirill against Ukrainian autocephaly and multiculturalism in Russia.

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  • blogTO notes that the TTC plans on raising fares for next year.

  • Centauri Dreams notes the evidence for an ocean on Pluto.

  • City of Brass' Aziz Poonawalla argues against Muslims voluntarily registering in an American listing of Muslims.

  • Dangerous Minds notes the sadness of Abbie Hoffman at Janis Joplin's use of IV drugs.

  • Joe. My. God. notes that Manhattan's Trump Place complex has opted to drop the name.

  • Language Hat looks at a seminal Arabic novel published in mid-19th century France.

  • Language Log looks at an intriguing Chinese-language sign in London.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that the US-Iran nuclear deal is likely to stay.

  • The LRB Blog looks at a critic's old building, an old warehouse, in New York City.

  • The NYRB Daily looks at the art of the spot illustration.

  • Window on Eurasia notes the state of interethnic relations in Kazakhstan.

  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some flowers of Mediterranean climate zones.

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Marc Campbell has a fantastic post over at Dangerous Minds talking about the vitality of the late 1970s/early 1980s music scene in New York City, an era of remarkable popularity and productivity.

Whether playing CBGB or not I probably spent most nights in 77/78 either there or at Max’s. It was the last great era of rock and roll as far as I’m concerned. We’ll be talking about The Ramones, Talking Heads and Patti Smith long after grunge bands like Alice In Chains and Soundgarden are long forgotten (if they’re not already). As far as music of this new century goes, I’m not sure much of it will be remembered 20 years from now. I’m not hearing anything that really blows me away. I wish I did. Maybe it’s me. Maybe I’m just an old fuck living in the past. But that past, particularly the glorious whole of the New York Club scene of the 70s and early 80s, was pretty fucking wonderful. Seen from a passing satellite I can imagine Manhattan, Brooklyn and The Bronx looking like a giant throbbing meatpit glimmering with copious amounts of sweat and dripping with… (use your imagination).

Punk, rap, disco and Latin music were drifting in and out of each other and the barriers separating uptown from downtown were being shattered. Blondie, B-52s and DEVO were being played at Studio 54 and bands like Liquid Liquid, Bush Tetras and Konk were taking disco’s four-on-the-floor beat and putting some angsty urban edge into the mix. The bottom line is people were dancing everywhere, even in clubs where people had been too cool to get crazy. Leaning on the bar and striking hipster poses looked pretty square when hundreds of people were going mad on the dance floor to The Gun Club’s invocation to “explode to the call… move, move, sex beat, go…!”

My own circuit included Danceteria, Peppermint Lounge, Mudd Club, Club 57 and Hurrah’s where new wave, post-punk and ska bands played regularly and deejays like Mark Kamins, Anita Sarko and Dany Johnson kept the crowds in perpetual motion.The segue from live bands to vinyl was an art that was being mastered as the scene unfolded and the best deejays were being born on the spot.

At downtown clubs like The Paradise Garage and The Saint deejays Larry Levan and Alan Dodd spun dance floor filling beats for predominantly gay clienteles who embraced divas Loleatta Holloway, Donna Summer, Grace Jones and Sylvester as well as euro-disco and the very beginnings of house music. These were the test markets for new singles by new artists and the latest dance re-mixes. If a 12-inch extended dance mix worked at The Paradise Garage it would work anywhere. It wasn’t long before rock bands like The Clash and Blondie were hitting the studios to re-work their tracks into dance mixes. No one was listening to radio. We were all too busy nightclubbing.
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  • Bad Astronomy notes the discovery of water vapour clouds in the atmosphere of nearby brown dwarf WISE 0855.

  • blogTO notes the imminent arrival of winter weather.

  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new theory of the Moon's origins suggesting the impact collision which create it was much more violent than we thought.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes how snowlines migrate across a system in the course of a star's life.

  • The LRB Blog reports on the mind-numbing legal complexities of Brexit.

  • The Map Room Blog reports on a new book of maps of New York City.

  • The NYRB Daily explores the making of a documentary in 1970 on Thomas Bernhard.

  • Seriously Science notes that kittens recognize the sounds of their mother.

  • Towleroad reports on a South African imam promoting gay rights at a Cape Town mosque.

  • Window on Eurasia argues Putin's annexation of Crimea made reform in Ukraine essential, and reports on budget cuts and their threat in the North Caucasus.

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I shared this link on the weekend, but I thought I'd share it again. Dangerous Minds hosts some pretty cool photos of Halloween partiers in New York City's West Village circa the early 1990s.
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Bloomberg's Gavin Finch notes that New York City, not necessarily any single European centre, could benefit the most from the decline of London post-Brexit as a financial centre.

New York, even more than Frankfurt or Paris, is emerging as a top candidate to lure banking talent if London’s finance industry is damaged by Britain’s divorce from the European Union, according to politicians and industry executives.

Follow @Brexit for the latest news, and sign up to our Brexit Bulletin for a daily roundup.

That’s because the largest U.S. city, rather than European finance hubs, is the place that rivals the depth of markets, breadth of expertise or regulatory appeal boasted by London. Continental Europe will win some bank operations to satisfy regional rules ensure time-zone-friendly access to its market, but more may eventually shift across the Atlantic to the only other one-stop shop for business.

“There is no way in the EU there is a center with the infrastructure or regulatory infrastructure to take the role London has," particularly in capital markets, John Nelson, chairman of Lloyd’s of London, said in an interview. "There is only one city in the world that can, and that is New York."

For many global investment banks, London is their largest or second-biggest headquarters. If the benefits of scale are diminished by having to move roles to Europe, banks may look to shrink their London operations even further by moving any workers able to do their job just as well from a different time zone, including global-facing roles in merger advisory, trading and back-office technology and finance.

Additional jobs may move as specific trading activities seek a new epicenter. London Stock Exchange Group Plc Chief Executive Officer Xavier Rolet was blunt, saying that if Brexit strips London of the ability to clear euro derivatives trades, the entire business would move to the only other city able to clear all 17 major currencies: New York.
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  • Antipope's Charlie Stross worries about the literal survival of Britons in the post-Brexit United Kingdom.

  • D-Brief notes the discovery of an ancient corpse in China shrouded in cannabis.

  • Dangerous Minds reports on a 1971 BBC documentary about New York City starring a pre-stardom Patti Smith.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a study mapping the changing clouds of the twin brown dwarfs of Luhman 16.

  • The Dragon's Tales reports on drops in atmospheric oxygen over the past hundred thousand years.

  • Language Hat reports on Italy's many dialects and their uses.

  • Language Log engages with Trump's non-apology.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at Ted Cruz's despair.

  • The LRB Blog looks at the classic architecture of Eritrea's capital, Asmara.

  • The Map Room Blog looks at Karen Margolis' art maps.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer continues to look at the Colombian referendum and notes on the difficulties of enabling the rule of law in Mexico.

  • Peter Rukavina remembers Prince Edward Island's Teachernet.

  • Window on Eurasia reports on a provocative argument about Russia's demographic past and its lop-sided urbanization.

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