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  • Anthony Easton at MacLean's writes in defense of Nickelback, one of Canada's most popular bands if not a critical darling.

  • Also in MacLean's, Stephanie Carvin notes that the new foreign and military policies announced by the Canadian government could still fall short.

  • Bloomberg View's Stephen L. Carter considers the idea of the just war through the lens of Wonder Woman.

  • Nuclear energy, it seems, will be India's answer to global warming in the era of Trump.

  • Qataris, Bloomberg notes, are trying to deal with their island country's state of siege.

  • Airbus may pull its production plants from the United Kingdom unless the country keeps single market access.

  • Refugees, Lynne Olson notes at National Geographic, helped save the United Kingdom during the Second World War.

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  • blgoTO notes how the Guild Inn was once a popular resort.

  • Centauri Dreams notes the import of real scientists in Arrival.

  • Crooked Timber notes that anti-Trump Republicans did not seem to matter in the election.

  • The Dragon's Gaze looks at cutting-edge options for studying exoplanets.

  • False Steps notes a proposed American spacecraft that would have landed on water.

  • Far Outliers notes the pointless internment of foreign domestics in Second World War Britain.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the potential impact of a Michael Bloomberg presidential run.

  • Marginal Revolution looks at the development of apps which aim to find out the preferred songs of birds.

  • Steve Munro and Transit Toronto look at ongoing controversy over the 514 Cherry streetcar line's noise, including upcoming public meetings.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer suggests the election of Trump could lead to the election of a similar populist to the presidency of Mexico.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy deals with the odd and seemingly meaningless distinction made by Americans between "republic" and "democracy".

  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Trump's negotiating style might lead to worse Russian-American relations and looks at his business history in Russia.
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Russia Beyond the Headlines' Gleb Fedorov notes that Russia remains strongly opposed to any talk of shared sovereignty with Japan over any of the Kuril islands.

Valery Kistanov, Japan expert from the Institute for Far Eastern Studies of the Russian Academy of Science, believes that the Nikkei article “was a deliberate leak” to test Russia’s reaction to this idea.

”Nikkei, a mouthpiece of Japan's business lobby, would not publish an article based on rumors,” Kistanov said. “I do not rule out the fact that this idea may have been discussed behind closed doors."

Dmitry Streltsov, an expert in Japan studies from the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), says the leak “may be aimed at publicly creating an illusion of the possibility of ‘jointly governed territories,’ which could be seen as a step forward for Japan.”

Former Russian Ambassador to Japan Alexander Panov, who is believed to have a certain degree of influence on Russia's foreign policy towards Japan told RBTH, that Moscow and Tokyo seem to have agreed to resolve the dispute in a step-by-step manner.

"Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga claimed that this (joint administration) was not part of a plan that Tokyo conveyed to Moscow,” Panov told RBTH. “What exactly was conveyed is not known.”
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  • A BCer in Toronto mourns the declining standards behind the Tim Horton's apple fritter.

  • blogTO notes that the Toronto vs everybody T-shirt has been redone in the original Iroquoian.

  • Centauri Dreams considers Project Orion.

  • Dangerous Minds shares vintage North Korean anti-American art.

  • The Dragon's Tales links to a paper suggesting that Mars' climate may have been cold but for impacts and volcanism.

  • Far Outliers examines the booming Nanjing of the 1930s.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the Long Island Universiy strike.

  • The NYRB Daily examines Hillary Clinton's troubles.

  • Personal Reflections uses a bus fire to examine the fragility of modern systems.

  • Towleroad shares news, and footage, of a Tom of Finland biopic.

  • Window on Eurasia links to a report sharing the costs of Russian aggression in Ukraine, including at least ten thousand people reported dead.

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  • At Apostrophen, 'Nathan Smith describes his experience at the CAN•CON conference in Ottawa.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper speculating about the consequences of observing a large extraterrestrial civilization.

  • Far Outliers notes how Chinese soldiers in 1937 Shanghai did not want to take prisoners.

  • The Frailest Thing's Michael Sacasas considers the idea of distraction in relationship to high technology.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the overlooked food workers who were victims of 9/11.

  • Savage Minds links to a variety of anthropologically-themed links.

  • Seriously Science notes that houses in rich neighbourhoods contain more diverse insect populations than houses in poor neighbourhoods.

  • Strange Maps looks at Proxima Centauri b and considers the idea of an "eyeball Earth".

  • Transit Toronto notes plans for construction at Queen and Dufferin.

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CBC News' Sima Sahar Zerehi has a photo-heavy feature describing how the decay of an American military base from the Second World War in Greenland threatens catastrophe.

It's an image that requires a double-take: a pristine Arctic landscape in Greenland, dotted with rusted debris from an abandoned World War II military base.

Bluie East II was a U.S. military base built in eastern Greenland in 1942. It was used to bring in supplies, refuel planes and manage flights in need of an emergency landing pad.

When the site, which housed 200 to 300 soldiers, was abandoned in 1947, everything was left behind to rust and break down.

"I was really just shocked at it, it was beyond belief," says Ken Bower, a graphic designer from New York City who stumbled across the site for the first time in 2012.

"You have this absolute pristine, picture-perfect landscape and then sitting in that landscape is all the hazardous materials."
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  • Centauri Dreams considers Juno's photos of Jupiter's poles.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes the discovery of another star that behaves much like mysterious Tabby's Star.

  • Far Outliers reports on the good reputation of the Chinese forces at Shanghai in 1937.

  • Joe. My. God. notes a Christian site that claims gay sex is not sex.

  • Language Hat reports on the problems of translating Elena Ferrante.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money and Noel Maurer are unimpressed by Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson.

  • The New APPS Blog writes against faculty lock-outs.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw describes the Parers, a Catalan-Australian family.

  • Window on Eurasia notes Ukraine's recognition of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, reports on how Russians resent Ukrainian refugees, and suggests the Russian economic crisis is finally hitting Moscow and St. Petersburg.

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  • blogTO notes that Green Day will be headlining a festival in the Distillery District.

  • Centauri Dreams looks at research into an interstellar solar sail.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes a study of brown dwarf populations.

  • The Dragon's Tales looks at ancient Martian rivers and flood plains.

  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the protest of Colin Kaepernick.

  • The Map Room Blog reports on a map exhibition at the Library of Congress.

  • Marginal Revolution notes low murder rates among Haitian-Americans in Florida.

  • The Planetary Society Blog examines the Dawn probe's low orbit scans of Ceres.

  • Otto Pohl announces the beginning of his first semester in Kurdistan.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that it is a crime to talk about the Nazi-Soviet alliance versus Poland in Russia.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at how North Caucasians in Moscow identify quickly as Muscovites.

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Bloomberg's article suggests a compromise such as desired by the Japanese, with a transfer of sovereignty over one or more of the islands, is not in the offing.

Russian President Vladimir Putin struck a conciliatory tone before talks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on a territorial dispute that’s prevented the countries from signing a World War II peace treaty.

Resolving the conflict over four islands occupied by the Soviet Union in the final days of the war should be part of “setting the stage for the development of inter-governmental relations for the long term,” Putin said in an interview on Thursday as he prepared to meet with Abe at the Eastern Economic Forum in Russia’s Pacific port city of Vladivostok on Friday.

“We’re not talking about some exchange or some sale,” Putin said. “We are talking about finding a solution where neither of the parties would feel defeated or a loser.”

The two leaders, especially Abe, seem keen to show that momentum is building toward a settlement on the island spat. Abe said after the talks that he and Putin had a deep discussion about a peace treaty and that he has a good feeling about making progress with a new approach, according to the Kyodo news service. They’ll meet at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Peru in November and will continue talks when Putin visits Abe’s home prefecture of Yamaguchi in southern Japan on Dec. 15, Kyodo reported.
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  • Bloomberg notes the recent challenge to one-family rule in Gabon, looks at Russia's new Internet firewall, examines the Syrian Kurds' withdrawal beyond the Euphrates, and reports on near-record migration into the United Kingdom.

  • Bloomberg View talks about inequality in China, looks at continuing disputes over Second World War history in Poland and Ukraine, and examines the things Texas and California have in common.

  • CBC reports on the impending release of a report on foreign workers, looks at the integration problems of Syrian refugees re: housing, and reports on Canada's interest in more immigration from China.

  • The Inter Press Service notes how drought is hurting cocoa farmers in Cameroon.

  • MacLean's looks at how some in the Conservative Party have not moved past same-sex marriage, describes how the new British Columbia tax on foreign buyers of real estate is deterring Chinese, and reports on the catastrophic potential of carbon release from melting permafrost.

  • National Geographic notes how the young generation sees Pluto and its classification history.

  • The National Post describes how design fans want the CBC to release its 1974 standards manual, and looks at controversy over a study claiming extensive support in mosques for extremist literature.

  • Wired has photos from the uninhabited cities of China, and describes the new prominence of the alt right.

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  • blogTO notes the all-gender washrooms of the CNE.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly looks at ways people can preserve themselves.

  • Dangerous Minds shares photos of homeless people, by themselves and dressed in their childhood dreams.

  • False Steps looks at a proposed Soviet orbital tug.

  • Far Outliers looks at the Navajo, at their pastoralist lifestyle, at their adaptiveness, and at their 1864-1865 deportation east and their 1868 return.

  • Marginal Revolution notes the extreme dependence of Australia on China.

  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the question of scale in a Mars photo.

  • Towleroad notes the impending success of Frank Ocean's album.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia is undercounting Ukrainians, despairs for the future of Russia-Ukraine relations, and notes the Hitler-Stalin alliance's legacies.

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  • The Big Picture shares photos from a Newfoundland where the cod fisheries are recovering.

  • blogTO notes the bars which will be screening the final concert of The Tragically Hip.

  • Centauri Dreams notes a paper finding that KIC 8462852 has been fading noticeably in recent years.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes the detection of circumpulsar disks.

  • Language Hat looks at the International Phonetic Alphabet.

  • The Map Room Blog notes Australia's updating of its GPS maps.

  • Otto Pohl notes the 75th anniversary of the Volga German deportation.

  • Torontoist has a lovely map of High Park.

  • Window on Eurasia argues Russia is likely to heat up the war in Ukraine by posing as a peacekeeper.

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Spacing Ottawa's Dwight Williams notes an odd, and reparable, lacuna in the list of figures commemorated on Ottawa's streets.

If you’ll permit some historical stage-setting: around the time frame of 1990-‘91, the former city of Gloucester began the process of building City Park Drive, a side street looping southwards off of Ogilvie Road near the Gloucester Centre Mall. There would eventually be side streets branching off within that loop for condominiums to be built and called home by hundreds of our neighbours.

Around the same time frame, construction began on the north side of Ogilvie on the current headquarters of the first of its best-known – and perhaps least understood – neighbours: the Canadian Security and Intelligence Service. A decade or so later, their military-affiliated counterparts, the Communications Security Establishment, would set up their own shop right next door. Both buildings are striking in terms of design for different reasons, and not the kind of design that one might expect or prefer for the headquarters of intelligence services. That matter of architectural taste can be argued another time in other venues.

To the point: however misunderstood the work of those organizations may be, it can nonetheless be argued that their work – and those of their forebears in the structure of the Canadian government – has at times been vital to Canada…and particularly when it comes to discussing World War II. One Canadian citizen in particular has been honoured with some justification for his work in that field. I’ve checked and discovered that his name has yet to be commemorated anywhere within the current city limits, and perhaps it is time that was now remedied.

That person is Sir William Stephenson, better known even now in some circles as “the Man Called Intrepid” thanks to his autobiography of the same name.
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  • Bloomberg considers wind power off of Long Island, looks at Odebrecht's progress despite high-level arrests, and notes New Zealand's criticism of China's maritime expansionism.

  • Bloomberg View notes that Germany is a country thoroughly opposed to genocide.

  • The CBC notes the Tragically Hip tickets have sold out, and looks at ice melt in Antarctica.

  • MacLean's notes the mounting of a monument in Moncton to the three RCMP officers recently killed there.

  • The National Post notes that Iraqi Kurds want to be armed, looks at how Calgary is a center for language change in Canadian English, and looks at how Australians want Canada to take in refugees.

  • Wired looks at the Louvre's defenses against flooding.

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  • Bloomberg looks at the restarting of northern Alberta oil, looks at the deterioration in Sino-Taiwanese relations, reports on how Norway is using oil money to buffer its economic shocks, and suggests low ECB rates might contribute to a property boom in Germany.

  • Bloomberg View notes the idea of a third party in the US, one on the right to counter Trump, will go nowhere.

  • The CBC notes the settlement of a residential school case in Newfoundland and Labrador and predicts a terrible fire season.

  • The Globe and Mail' Kate Taylor considers Canadian content rules in the 21st century.

  • The Inter Press Service notes that planned Kenyan closures of Somali refugee camps will have terrible results.

  • National Geographic looks at the scourge that is Pablo Escobar's herd of hippos in Colombia.

  • The National Post notes VIA Rail's existential need for more funding and reports on Jean Chrétien's support of decriminalizing marijuana.

  • Open Democracy looks at controversies over Victory Day in Georgia, and notes the general impoverishment of Venezuela.

  • Vice looks at new, accurate dinosaur toys, feathers and all.

  • Wired explains why Israel alone of America's clients can customize F-35s.

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  • blogTO notes a new union for Toronto freelancers.

  • Dangerous Minds notes a Chinese ban on live streams of women eating bananas seductively.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes a paper purporting to provide ways for telescopes to distinguish between exo-Venuses and exo-Earths.

  • The Dragon's Tales links to a study modelling the collision between Theia and the proto-Earth that created the moon.

  • Language Log notes Chinese colloquialisms.

  • The LRB Blog reflects on the environmental and political implications of the Fort McMurray fire.

  • Marginal Revolution recommends postponing tourism to some exotic destinations until they build up the needed infrastructure.

  • The NYRB Daily introduces readers to the Weimar-era novel Grand Hotel.

  • I disagree with Peter Watts' argument that things need to get worse before they get better.

  • North!'s Justin Petrone reflects on his experience of the esoteric in Estonia.

  • Window on Eurasia notes the importance of the Soviet victory in the Second World War as a way of justifying Russian hegemony.

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  • The Dragon's Gaze notes evidence that Kardashev Type III civilizations do not exist.

  • The Dragon's Tales notes the new Kenya-Somalia border war, suggests the United Arab Emirates will be building a mountain to try to trigger rain, and notes that the new French-built submarines of Australia will come with American tech parts.

  • Language Log looks at the changing meaning of "feel".

  • Marginal Revolution suggests Russian power might be on an upswing and looks at European Union proposals to fine countries which do not accept refugees.

  • The NYRB Daily notes the controversy surrounding Poland's Second World War museum at Gdansk.

  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at robotic activity around the solar system.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer considers the question of whether or not Napoleonic rule did kickstart growth in western Germany.

  • Savage Minds continues the discussion of decolonizing anthropology.

  • Torontoist notes a protest tomorrow by Ontario parents unhappy that the provincial government will not cover enough of an effective autism program.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at class divisions in Russia and notes a proposal to divert water from Siberian rivers to China.

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  • Beyond the Beyond's Bruce Sterling reflects on the apparent absence of Kardashev Type III civilizations.

  • Centauri Dreams looks at beamed power systems for spacecraft.

  • The Dragon's Gaze looks at the debris disks of Zeta Reticuli.

  • The Dragon's Tales notes NASA's interest in researching deep space habitats.

  • Far Outliers evaluates Romania's Second World War-era dictator Antonescu.

  • The LRB Blog responds to Beyoncé's Lemonade.

  • Out There interviews Mike Brown about the search for Planet Nine.

  • Personal Reflections considers the impact of asylum controversies in Australia.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer still thinks Trump is dangerous.

  • Towleroad notes the advent of LGBT equality in the Faroe Islands.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers whether Prince's estate could sue magazines for lying about him having AIDS.

  • Window on Eurasia notes a Russian claim that the country's newly-discovered Christianity prevents it from collaborating with the West.

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  • blogTO notes that Disney forced a Toronto lightsaber event to change its name.

  • The Dragon's Tales examines cryolava on Titan.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes a new book examining sexuality in the United States during the Second World War.

  • The Map Room Blog links to a map of Edmonton by building age.

  • The Power and the Money's Douglas Muir argues that nothing has changed to make him think that the Syrian civil war will end earlier.

  • Savage Minds notes some Israeli anthropologists who support the idea of a boycott.

  • Torontoist hosts a debate about the LCBO's future.

  • Window on Eurasia notes Russian criticism of Western suspicion of Putin.

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