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  • blogTO describes the changing designs of TTC maps over the past generations.

  • Cody Delistraty links to an article of his contrasting and comparing Donald Trump to Louis XIV.

  • Marginal Revolution shares facts about Qatar in this time of its issues.

  • Peter Rukavina describes the latest innovations in his homebrew blogging.

  • Towleroad notes the sad anniversary of the Pulse massacre in Orlando.

  • Window on Eurasia argues that there is still potent for Idel-Ural, a coalition of non-Russian minorities by the Volga.

  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell examines how Labour and the Tories made use of Big Data, and how Labour did much better.

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  • blogTO reports on the history of Toronto's Wellington Street.

  • Dangerous Minds introduces me to the grim American gothic that is Wisconsin Death Trip. What happened to Black River Falls in the 1890s?

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to hypotheses about KIC 8462852, one suggesting KIC 8462852 has four exoplanets, another talking about a planet's disintegration.

  • The Dragon's Tales links to a paper modeling the mantles of icy moons.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at small city NIMBYism in the Oregon city of Eugene.

  • The LRB Blog reports on toxically racist misogyny directed towards Labour's Diane Abbott by Tory minister David Davis, "misogynoir" as it is called.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw reports on the elections in Indonesia, a country increasingly important to Australia.

  • Peter Rukavina describes how the builders of his various indie phones, promising in their own rights, keep dropping them.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer is optimistic that NAFTA will survive mostly as is.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy examines the ruling against Trump's immigration order on the grounds that its planners explicitly designed it as an anti-Muslim ban.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the treaty-based federalism of Tatarstan within Russia is increasingly unpopular with many wanting a more centralized country.

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  • At Apostrophen, 'Nathan Smith writes about the status of his various writing projects.

  • Beyond the Beyond's Bruce Sterling links to an article examining pieces of software that have shaped modern music.

  • blogTO notes the expansion of the Drake Hotel to a new Junction site. Clearly the Drake is becoming a brand.

  • Citizen Science Salon looks at how Internet users can help fight illegal fishing in the Pacific.

  • Crooked Timber asks readers for new Doctor Who candidates.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper finding that the presence of Proxima Centauri would not have inhibited planetary formation around Alpha Centauri A and B.

  • The LRB Blog notes the growing fear among Muslims in the diaspora.

  • The Map Room Blog shares a reimagined map of the Paris metro.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy and Towleroad have very different opinions on the nomination of Neil Gorusch to the US Supreme Court.

  • Transit Toronto reports on the reopening of the TTC parking lot at Yorkdale.

  • Whatever's John Sclazi responds to the past two weeks of Trump-related chaos, and is not impressed.

  • Window on Eurasia notes that the Russian Orthodox Church carries itself as an embattled minority because it is one, and looks at the future of Russian federalism in regards to Tatarstan.

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  • blogTO notes concerns in Church and Wellesley about a spike of reported anti-gay violence.

  • Crooked Timber looks at the shambolic mess that is the Republican healthcare plan.

  • Language Hat links to an article concerned with the question of how to try cracking the Indus Valley script.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the malevolence and incompetence of the Trump Administration are record-breaking.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer notes that the proposed border tax on Mexican imports is likely workable for all the major actors.

  • Strange Maps examines with maps how families of landowners centuries old still own huge swathes of downtown London.

  • Une heure de peine's Denis Colombi examines, in French and in the French political context, the idea of a guaranteed minimum income.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy shares Emma Lazarus' poem "The New Colossus" welcoming refugees to American shores.

  • Window on Eurasia notes the concerns of one Tatar historian that Russian federalism is being undermined and looks at the consequences of Putin's chat with Trump.

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  • Anthropology.net describes an effort to digitize tapes recording Navajo oral history.

  • Centauri Dreams remembers Vera Rubin.

  • D-Brief looks
  • Dangerous Minds shares a 1984 TV clip featuring George Michael and Morrissey talking about Joy Division.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper suggesting a gas giant exoplanet might be indicated by a protoplanetary disk.

  • Language Log reports on how Chinese netizens are criticizing pollution through the mockery of official slogans.

  • Language Hat looks at the question of how the word "pecan" is pronounced.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues political science is not a science at all, like economics.

  • The NYRB Daily notes that the shared inability of Trump and Putin to plan things and account for unexpected consequences does not lend itself to optimism.

  • Window on Euruasia looks at Tatarstan's issues with regional transfer funding in Russia and shares an apocalyptic account of what will happen to Ukraine in the Russian sphere of influence.

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  • Bad Astronomy shares a video imagining of how Cassini will meet its end with Saturn.

  • Cody Delistraty shares an interview with Rebecca Solnit.

  • Far Outliers reports on Margaret Thatcher's unorthodox campaign in 1979.

  • Joe. My. God. shares Hillary Clinton's thanks to her 66 million voters.

  • Marginal Revolution looks at gender stereotypes among scientists.

  • The NYRB Daily talks about the visual art of Pipilotti Rist.

  • Otto Pohl commemorates the 73rd anniversary of the deportation of the Kalmyks.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests China might follow Russia's Crimea strategy in invading Taiwan, and looks at the latest on controversies about Tatar identity and genetics.

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  • Bad Astronomy reports on the astounding scientific illiteracy of Trump advisor Anthony Scaramucci.

  • blogTO compiles a list of the best tobagganing hills in Toronto.

  • Citizen Science Salon looks at what we can do in the redwood forests.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes a gap in the disk of TW Hydrae.

  • Imageo notes that 2016 is the warmest year in the records.

  • Joe. My. God. notes that a pride parade protected by police went off in Montenegro.

  • Language Hat shares the story of Lazer Lederhendler, a son of Holocaust survivors in Montréal who became one of the leading translators into English of Québec literature.

  • Language Log looks at the distant origins of Japanese terms for "dog."

  • Marginal Revolution notes the rising popularity of Vladimir Putin on the American right.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer looks at the links between Russia and the "Calexit" movement.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy celebrates Saturnalia.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russia's use of genetics to disentangle the Tatar peoples and argues that the definition of Russians and Ukrainians as fraternal is dangerous to the latter.

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  • Beyond the Beyond links to an interview with Darran Anderson, a writer of cartographic fiction.

  • Centauri Dreams notes that 2028 will be a time when microlensing can b used to study the area of Alpha Centauri A.

  • The Crux engages with the question of whether or not an astronaut's corpse could seed life on another planet.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a study that gathers together signals for planetary companions orbiting nearby stars.

  • Joe. My. God. notes that the only gay bar in Portland, Maine, is set to close.

  • Language Log notes the proliferation of Chinese characters and notes that a parrot could not be called to the stand in Kuwait.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the last time the Chicago Cubs won, Germany was an empire.

  • The Map Room Blog notes the discovery of an ancient stone map on the Danish island of Bornholm.

  • The Planetary Society Blog examines some of the New Horizons findings of Pluto.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer argues that Venezuela is now a dictatorship.

  • Towleroad notes
  • Window on Eurasia notes a Russian cleric's call for the children of ethnically mixed marriages in Tatarstan to be legally identified as Russians.

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  • Bad Astronomy notes that a NASA probe has photographed the site on Mars where the ESA's Schiaparelli lander crashed.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly writes about being an immigrant, of sorts, in the United States.

  • C.J. Cherry announces that work on her history of the Alliance-Union universe is continuing.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper looking at the ionization of protoplanetary disks by cosmic radiations.

  • The Dragon's Tales finds evidence for Planet Nine in the orbits of Kuiper Belt objects and the inner Oort cloud.

  • Far Outliers looks at the culture of addiction in Appalachia.

  • Joe. My. God. notes how a Russian embassy has mocked the European Union for defending GLBT rights.

  • Language Log looks at the sounds made by speakers of English, native and Chinese-language mother tongue both.

  • The Map Room Blog links to a map of the river basins of the United States.

  • Torontoist looks at the history of clowns in Toronto.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at how Central Asia is non-Muslim, reports a call for a historical reorientation of Azerbaijan, reports on a Tatar dramatist's fear that Russia is trying to assimilate non-Russians, and looks at how a court in Sakha has defended the constitutional rights of the republic and its titular people.

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  • blogTO notes a photo series celebrating the corner stores of Toronto and reports on massive condo towers planned for Yonge and College.

  • Centauri Dreams notes the antimatter sail as a potential future propulsion technology.

  • D-Brief notes the beginning of a search for an Earth-like planet orbiting Alpha Centauri A or B.

  • Joe. My. God. notes that it is Ecuador that disrupted Assange's Internet connection.

  • Language Hat looks at distinctions between fiction and non-fiction in different literatures.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how Republicans are concerned for the future of the US Supreme Court and links to Matt Taibbi's article suggesting that Trump might reinforce the existing American system.

  • Maximos62 links to his new audiobook of tales from Asia and the Pacific.

  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the relationship between rapidly rotating regular satellite and their tides.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests that language shift among the Kalmyks to Russia has not weakened their ethnic identity, and shares arguments that Tatarstan and Bashkortostan must be brought back into line in with Russia's national government.

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  • Joe. My. God. notes that Peter Thiel gave $US 1.25 million to the Donald Trump campaign.

  • Language Log reports on one parents issues with traditional Chinese characters.

  • Marginal Revolution reflects on the interaction between pain medication and labour force participation.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares the right's criticisms of Hillary Clinton for her politics and Miley Cyrus for her sexuality.

  • The NYRB Daily reports on one Syrian's despair at the fighting in his country.

  • Window on Eurasia reports on history wars in Tatarstan over Ivan the Terrible and looks at Belarus' opening to the European Union.

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  • blogTO looks at 1970s representations of Toronto on television and in film.

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the genesis of antimatter propulsion.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper asking if we might be one of the first intelligent civilizations to arise.

  • Joe. My. God. notes the questioned future of Orlando's Pulse nightclub.

  • Language Log reports on a fascinating-sounding concert of the Turkic world's music.

  • Understanding Society's Daniel Little considers ethnographic studies of far-right movements and their memberships.

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  • Beyond the Beyond's Bruce Sterling mourns the death of Alvin Toffler.

  • The Big Picture shares images of the Istanbul airport attack.

  • blogTO notes Toronto's recent Trans March was the largest in world history.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly interviews memoirist Plum Johnson.

  • Centauri Dreams considers the determination of distances to dim stars and looks at the total energies likely to be used in interstellar travel and interplanetary colonization.

  • Crooked Timber notes the ordered recount in Austria's presidential elections and advocates for anti-militarism.

  • D-Brief notes the exciting discoveries of Ceres, and observes that ancient tombs may have doubled as astronomical observatories.

  • The Dragon's Gaze considers where warm Jupiters form, considers the stability of complex exoplanet systems, and notes a high-precision analysis of solar twin HIP 100963.

  • The Dragon's Tales wonders if the shape of Martian sand dunes indicate a denser Martian atmosphere a bit more than four billion years ago.

  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers evictions and poverty in the United States.

  • Inkfish notes that different honeybees seem to have different personalities.

  • Language Hat notes the import of Maltese in Mediterranean history.

  • Language Log talks about Sino-Japanese.

  • Lovesick Cyborg shares the doubts of polled Americans with the viability of virtual lovers.

  • The LRB Blog shares an article supporting Corbyn.

  • The Map Room Blog notes that San Francisco was literally built on buried ships.

  • Marginal Revolution notes the collapse of Greek savings and looks at Euroskepticism's history in the United Kingdom.

  • Steve Munro updates readers on Union-Pearson Express ridership.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer thinks the Netherlands Antilles offer useful models to the United Kingdom, and is confused by a claim that that bias against Mexican immigrants does not exist when the data seems to suggest it does.

  • Torontoist goes into the life of conservative Protestant newspaper publishing Black Jack Robinson.

  • Transit Toronto notes that in a decade, GO Trains will connect Hamilton to Niagara Falls.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy argues against using the Brexit vote to argue against referenda.

  • Window on Eurasia notes the Russian deployment of military forces to the Belarus border, looks at Tatarstan's concern for its autonomy, observes the changing demographics of Ukraine, and notes the Russian debate over what sort of European Union collapse they would like.

  • Arnold Zwicky remembers his father through ephemera.

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  • Acts of Minor Treason's Andrew Barton writes about the deep, ineradicable, legacies of the past.

  • The Dragon's Tales looks at China's Shijian-10 reusable satellite.

  • Far Outliers notes the bloody naval tactics of the War of the Spanish Succession and looks at the plight of the post-war English sailors in the Caribbean.

  • Geocurrents explains why Muslims in Tatarstan are much less radicalized than their Chechen counterparts.

  • Language Hat looks at the 2002 Nobel lecture of Imre Kertész.

  • Marginal Revolution misreads talk of Brexit as political theatre.

  • Steve Munro looks at the ability of the TTC to absorb, or not, an influx of money from the federal government.

  • pollotenchegg maps various language minorities in Ukraine.

  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Putin's new National Guard will affect Chechnya's Kadyrov, and wonders if Putin is preparing to strike against oligarchs for the elections.

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  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer is concerned with Trump: what would happen if a terrorist attack occurred under his rule, would he actually be able to save money from changing foreign basing, do terrorist attacks help him in the polls?

  • Towleroad notes the advent of marriage equality in Greenland.

  • Window on Eurasia notes legal challenges to Russian autocracy in regional courts, notes Tatarstan's controversial support of the Gagauz, notes Protestants in Ukraine are strongly Ukrainian, and analyzes Russia's response to the Brussels attack.

  • The Financial Times' The World notes Poland's use of public relations firms to deal with its PR problems.

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  • Gerry Canavan shares his curriculum for his course on the lives of animals.

  • Centauri Dreams reflects on Pluto.

  • The Everyday Sociology Blog notes the predominance of "dead white guys" in sociology.

  • Geocurrents notes the awkward position of Tatarstan, caught between Russia and Turkey.

  • Joe. My. God. notes same-sex marriage will be available in Greenland from the 1st of April.

  • Language Hat reacts to the controversial French spelling reform.

  • The Map Room Blog links to a site of judgemental maps of cities.

  • Marginal Revolution notes the surprisingly strong resistance to anesthesia in the 19th century.

  • Towleroad notes that the time Freddie Mercury and Princess Diana went to a London gay bar will be made into a musical.

  • Window on Eurasia notes one response to separatism in the Russian Far East.

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  • BCer in Toronto Jeff Jedras foodblogs from different Ottawa junkets.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly lists 20 ways to enjoy winter. (If it comes.)

  • Centauri Dreams shares the latest Pluto imagery and examines the ancient impact that created the Moon.

  • Crooked Timber notes that volunteers who help refugees arriving in Greece might be criminalized.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes that some Earth-like worlds at different points in their history might be difficult to identify, and notes a SETI search looking for flashes from KIC 8462852 has turned up nothing.

  • Geocurrents maps development in the Philippines.

  • Marginal Revolution shares Alex Tabarrok's opinion that home ownership is overrated.

  • The Planetary Society Blog's Marc Rayman notes how important light is for Dawn"s imaging of Ceres.

  • pollotenchegg notes the historical patterns of ethnic change in southeast Ukraine, the Donbas standing out as especially Russian in population in language.

  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes demographic changes in Chechnya.

  • Transit Toronto notes that Toronto has gotten its 14th and 15th streetcars from Bombardier.

  • Window on Eurasia examines possible outcomes from Tatarstan's confrontation with the Russian federal government, notes the influence of Central Asian migrants on Russian Islam, suggests Russia is over-centralized, and notes one proposal to abolish Russia's ethnic units.

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Earlier this month, Paul Goble at Window on Eurasia linked/a> to "Экономические последствия распада РФ. Только факты, без эмоций", translated by Google as "The economic consequences of the collapse of the Russian Federation. Just the facts, without emotion". This article imagined a scenario where the Russian Federation would come apart at the seams, on ethnic and economic lines, as indicated by the map below.



In most cases, the independence of the subjects of the current Russian Federation will allow for economic growth and an increase in the standard of living of the population because they will not have to send so much of their income to Moscow whose “’elites’” care only about how to remain in power and how much wealth they can take from the population.

There are three reasons, the Ukrainian analysts say, why the regions and republics may separate from the USSR: “a desire to independently control their own natural resources, nationality concerns, and close economic ties with other countries. In many cases, these are mixed, but the analysts consider each group in turn.

The regions and republics which might separate from Russia in order to control their natural resources include Bashkortostan, the Astrakhan Republic, Buryatia, Komi, a unified Don-Kuban, Sakha, the Siberian Republic, Tatarstan, the Urals Republic, Yugra, and the Orenburg Republic, all of which would see their incomes rise with independence.

The regions and republics which might separate from Russia in order to promote the needs of their titular nationality include a united Altay, Adygeya, Kalmykia, Mari-El, Mordvinia, Tyva, Chuvashia, Daghestan, Chechnya, Kabardino-Balkaria, North Osetia-Alania, Karachayevo-Cherkesia, and Ingushetia.

And those who might separate because of close ties with foreign countries are the Far Eastern Republic, the Kaliningrad Republic, Karelia, and the Kurile Islands.


This scenario strikes me as unlikely, requiring a thorough collapse of the Russian Federation. What would it take for areas with Russian majorities of population to want to separate from a Russian state? There are reasons why Québec and Catalonia have stronger separatist movements than, say, Manitoba and Essex. Why would regions with non-Russian majorities necessarily want to reject links with Russia for an uncertain independence? The most likely candidates for secession from Russia are to be found in the North Caucasus, home to mostly non-Russian populations with some measure of cultural distance from Russia, but separatism is dim even in autonomist Tatarstan.
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  • blogTO notes that Québec chain Simons will be opening up stories in Toronto and Mississauga in the coming years.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly notes that The Devil Wears Prada actually offers good advice to job-seekers.

  • Centauri Dreams notes a search program for planets at Proxima Centauri and considers Proxima's linkage to the Alpha Centauri A-B binary.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes distant gas giant HD 106906b.

  • Joe. My. God. notes that acceptance of gays is at an all-time high.

  • The Map Room Blog links to an exhibition of colonial cartography of Algeria and points to an essay on critical cartography.

  • Marginal Revolution notes high levels of female mortality in the US South.

  • Savage Minds considers the question of how to exhibit physical artifacts in an era of 3-D printing.

  • John Scalzi's Whatever and Charlie Stross' Antipope mourn the death of science fiction editor David Hartwell.

  • Window on Eurasia notes Russia's growing difficulties wth Chechen dictator Kadyrov, observes that most Tajiks recruited for ISIS are recruited as workers in Russia, suggests the annexation of Crimea helped bolster Russia's ethnic Russian and Slavic populations, and notes hostility in Chuvashia towards Russian language policy in education.

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross talks about the American far right and the popularity of Trump.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly writes about her shortlist of places to visit around the world.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes the trinary brown dwarf system VHS 1256-1257.

  • The Dragon's Tales notes the use of CRISPR to edit human genomes.

  • Geocurrents has a mini-atlas showing the diversity of the Russian Federation.

  • Joe. My. God. notes that Taiwan's new president, Tsai Ing-wen, is strongly pro-gay to the point of supporting same-sex marriage.

  • Language Log and The Dragon's Tales both reacted to news, product of genetic studies, suggesting that the Celts were recent arrivals to Ireland.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at birtherism as now applied to Ted Cruz, perhaps being too gleeful, while Joe. My. God. notes Trump's use of this rhetoric.

  • The Map Room Blog links to a map showing the relative economic strength of different Japanese municipalities.

  • Marginal Revolution looks at Walmart in the context of its store closings.

  • The Planetary Society Blog shares some Cassini photos of the Saturn system, including Titan and Enceladus.

  • Towleroad notes that Truvada, as used for PrEP, is no more risky than aspirin.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests anti-Putin protests are most likely in relatively prosperous regions like Moscow, Tatarstan, and Bashkortostan, and notes a push to make Russian an official language of the European Union.

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