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  • These Forest Hill homeowners' claim that renovating neighbours stole their intellectual property seem silly to me. The Toronto Star reports.

  • Shawn Micallef notes that the traditional architecture style of Toronto is of one pastiche or another. Maybe modernism especially?

  • Toronto Life shares photos of a beautiful waterfront home in the Beaches, one I have passed by frequently. Only $6 million!

  • Ellen Scheinberg of Spacing tells how detective work tracked down the house that was subject of Lawren Harris' "Toronto House".

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  • VICE suggests that drag in Brooklyn is having a big creative moment.

  • This interview with the director of the Tom of Finland biopic sounds like he has grasped the issues.

  • LiveScience tells of a formal study suggesting heterosexual guys prefer bromances to straight relationships ... huh.

  • Does online dating have the ability to transform society, by making all kinds of unexpected links across boundaries? Technology Review reports.

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  • The way art helped build a stronger community in Parkdale is the subject of this NOW Toronto article.

  • The AGO has just landed a new curator of indigenous art, Anishinabe-kwe artist Wanda Nanibush.

  • Transitions Online notes how, under Communism, different Balkan peoples kept looking to a different west for entertainment.

  • MacLean's looks at the history of Canadian Thanksgiving.

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  • Anthropology.net notes that the analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton from Croatia reveals much common ancestry.

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of Jupiter taken by the Juno probe.

  • Crooked Timber considers the differences--such as they are--between science fiction and fantasy literature.

  • After a conversation with Adam Gopnik, Cody Delistraty makes a case for the importance of high-brow culture.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes a paper arguing that Earth-like planets can exist even without active plate tectonics.

  • The Frailest Thing's Michael Sacasas argues that operating systems relying on instinct hurt human thought.

  • Language Log considers Twitter post limits for East Asian languages.

  • The LRB Blog considers trench fever and the future of nursing in the United Kingdom.

  • Marginal Revolution links to a study suggesting people actively look out for bad and threatening news items.

  • The NYR Daily examines the reasons why Uber ended up getting banned by the city of London.

  • Drew Rowsome reports on an exciting new staging at the Paramount Theatre of Salt-Water Moon.

  • Starts With A Bang's Ethan Siegel looks at the very low proportion of planets in studied exosystems actually detected by Kepler.

  • Strange Company tells the story of John Banvard, a 19th century American who lost everything in mounting panorama exhibitions.

  • Towleroad reports on how PREP contributed to an 80% fall in new HIV diagnoses in London and wider England.

  • Window on Eurasia notes the worsening of HIV/AIDS in Russia, aided by terrible government policy and bad statistics.

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a team of students who caught footage of the August solar eclipse from a high-altitude balloon.

  • D-Brief notes the discovery that the early Moon apparently had a very thin atmosphere for tens of millions of years.

  • The Dragon's Tales links to Elon Musk's descriptions of his space ambitions.

  • Hornet Stories notes that many on the alt-right are upset that game Wolfenstein is all about shooting Nazis.

  • The LRB Blog notes the almost ridiculous irony of Conservative Theresa May wearing a bracelet with the image of radical leftist Frida Kahlo.

  • Russell Darnley looks at efforts to get Singapore restaurants to shift away from using environmentally damaging palm oil.

  • The NYR Daily looks at the overwhelming power of the NRA in the modern United States.

  • The Planetary Society Blog considers ways we can do SETI better by having a less Eurocentric understanding of our own history.

  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Uzbekistan and Kyrgzystan could solve border issues through swapping enclaves.

  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the corrosive effect of Bannon, and journalistic culture generally, on politics.

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  • This article looks at the amazing queer parties that were major nightlife features in the 1930s US. The Guardian reports.


  • City News looks at how drag queens are becoming high-demand performers in RuPaul-era Toronto.

  • Ruth La Ferla shares a stunning contemporary photo exhibit by Michael Sharkey of the fashion of out queer youths. The New York Times reports.

  • A new gay-themed novel by Matt Cain is going to get crowdfunded after being rejected by traditional publisher as "too gay". The Guardian reports.

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  • The National Post notes that Toronto city council voted against naming a stadium after the late Rob Ford.

  • blogTO notes that Humber Bay Shores wants to run a private neighbourhood bus service, for want of a TTC presence.

  • Andrew Hunter, former Canadian curator at the AGO, calls for a decolonization of art galleries across Canada.

  • Joanna Lavoie describes the concrete sculptures of Duane Linklater newly installed across the Don valley.

  • At Torontoist, Dennis Duffy reports on the 19th century criminal gangs once populating the Don Valley. Seriously.

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  • Anthrodendum takes a look at the way community knowledge is now being subject to a privatization.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlyn Kelly starts a discussion about what makes home.

  • Bruce Dorminey suggests a pre-Theia, Moon-sized impactor gave the Earth its metal crust.

  • The Dragon's Gaze looks at the current state of knowledge about Proxima b.

  • The Dragon's Tales notes that Russia is apparently testing advanced nuclear weapons.

  • The Frailest Thing's Michael Sacasas considers the religious impulse in so many technophiles' view of the world.

  • Language Hat considers the dynamics associated with learning minority languages in Europe.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a classic traffic safety clip from 1913.

  • The LRB Blog mourns the loss of Glen Newey, long-time contributor.

  • Lovesick Cyborg notes a NASA study into the economics of a viable space-based solar power project.

  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the açorda of Portugal, a bread-based broth that was a long-time food of the poor.

  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands celebrates the passage of summer into fall through photos of her vegetable garden.

  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the representation of LGBTQ people on television, and sees much reason for cheer.

  • Science Sushi notes that different dolphin groups seem to have different dialects.

  • Understanding Society takes a look at Robert Merton's refinement of social functionalism.

  • Window on Eurasia notes that many ethnic Russians in Belarus, as in Ukraine, have shifted identity to that of the titular nation.

  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes one mistake made about artificial intelligence: it is not automatically more accurate.

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  • Kevin Ritchie noted in NOW Toronto that this Nuit Blanche will be dominated by the theme of protest and revolution.

  • Chris Rattan talks with different curators and artists about what public art in Toronto should aim to do.

  • NOW Toronto lists its top ten exhibits for Nuit Blanche.

  • Toronto Life lists some cool places to visit for Nuit Blanche.

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  • Hundreds of parrots in a Surrey sanctuary are still waiting for permanent homes. Global News reports.

  • NPR reports on how many Uighurs in China find success through their racially mixed appearances, as models.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer explains the rationale behind the Jones Act, with its stiff shipping charges for Puerto Rico.

  • The Chinese Buddhist fangsheng ritual, involving the release of captured animals into the wild, has issues. The Guardian reports.

  • Tyson Yunkaporta's essay takes a look at the appeal of SF/F, and post-apocalyptic fiction, for indigenous peoples.

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  • Bad Astronomy's Phil Plait notes the continuing maps and naming of the Pluto system.

  • Centauri Dreams considers one method to detect photosynthesis on Earth-like worlds of red dwarf stars.

  • D-Brief notes the discovery of Octlantis, a permanent community of octopi located off the coast of Australia.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes Earth-like world can co-exist with a Jovian in a circumstellar habitable zone.

  • Hornet Stories notes that Morrissey is now in Twitter. (This will not go well.

  • Language Log notes the kanji tattoo of one American neo-Nazi.

  • The LRB Blog notes how the English town of Tewksbury is still recovering from massive flooding a decade later.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the improbable life of Barry Sadler, he of "The Ballad of the Green Berets".

  • The Map Room Blog shares this terrifying map examining the rain footprint of Hurricane Irma.

  • Spacing reviews a fascinating dual biography of architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson.

  • Window on Eurasia notes an call to restore to maps the old Chinese name for former Chinese Tuva, Uryankhai.

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  • Anthrodendum offers resources for understanding race in the US post-Charlottesville.

  • D-Brief notes that exoplanet WASP-12b is a hot Jupiter that is both super-hot and pitch-black.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper examining various models of ice-covered worlds and their oceans' habitability.

  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the value placed by society on different methods of transport.

  • Far Outliers looks at how Chinese migrants were recruited in the 19th century.

  • Hornet Stories notes that the authorship of famously bad fanfic, "My Immortal", has been claimed, by one Rose Christo.

  • Marginal Revolution notes one explanation for why men are not earning more. (Bad beginnings matter.)

  • Peter Watts has it with facile (and statistically ill-grounded) rhetoric about punching Nazis.

  • At the NYR Daily, Masha Gessen is worried by signs of degeneration in the American body politic.

  • Livejournal's pollotenchegg maps the strength of Ukrainian political divisions in 2006 and 2010.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer is afraid what AI-enabled propaganda might do to American democracy in the foreseeable future.

  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an enjoyable bagel breakfast at Pondichéry's Auroville Café.

  • Drew Rowsome celebrates the introduction of ultra-low-cost carriers for flyers in Canada.

  • Strange Company notes the 19th century haunting of an English mill.

  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars, and Muslims in Crimea, are facing more repression.

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of uploading a digital "Golden Record" into the memory of New Horizons.

  • Crooked Timber takes a look at American legal writer (and judge) Richard Posner's embrace of pragmatism. What does it mean?

  • D-Brief notes the rapid melting of the glaciers that feed the major rivers of Asia.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper considering ways to detect planets in orbit of red giants.

  • The LRB Blog considers the potential for political tumult in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of arrests and rumours.

  • The Map Room Blog links to a new gravity map of Mars, revealing the crust of that world to be less dense and more variable than thought.

  • The NYR Daily looks at the South China Sea dispute in the wake of Indonesia's newly restated claims.

  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at Philadelphia's seasonal cookie--spiced wafer--wars.

  • Drew Rowsome is a big fan of the movie adaptation of It.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, for want of better options, the Donbas republics' people might return to Ukraine.

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning deep-field pictures of intergalactic space.

  • Centauri Dreams shares the second part of Larry Klaes' analysis of Forbidden Planet.

  • D-Brief suggests that controlled kangaroo hunting may be necessary for the ecological health of Australia.

  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new radio telescope in British Columbia that may help solve the mystery of fast radio burst.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes that quasars can irradiate a noteworthy fraction of potentially Earth-like planets.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money comes out against the idea of giving Amazon massive tax breaks for HQ2.

  • The LRB Blog bids a fond farewell to Saturn probe Cassini.

  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting new ideas--hence, new sources of economic growth--are harder to come by.

  • Maximos62 recounts a quietly chilling trip to East Timor where he discovers a landscape marked by genocide.

  • The New APPS Blog is quite unsurprised by news that Russians may have used Facebook to manipulate the US election.

  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane bids a fond farewell to colleague Len Wein.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw does not think Australia is committed enough to affordable housing to solve homelessness Finland-style.

  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the Suwalki Gap, the thin corridor joining the Baltic States to Poland.

  • Peter Rukavina looks at how a storied land rover was recovered from St. Helena.

  • Starts With A Bang's Ethan Siegel lists the top six discoveries of Cassini at Saturn.

  • Towleroad notes fundamentally misaimed criticism of new AI that determines sexual orientation from facepics.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at contemporary Russian fears about the power of rising China in Russia's Asian territories.

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  • Acts of Minor Treason's Andrew Barton reacts to the series premiere of Orville, finding it oddly retrograde and unoriginal.

  • Centauri Dreams shares Larry Klaes' article considering the impact of the 1956 classic Forbidden Planet on science and science fiction alike.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper wondering if it is by chance that Earth orbits a yellow dwarf, not a dimmer star.

  • Drone360 shares a stunning video of a drone flying into Hurricane Irma.

  • Hornet Stories celebrates the 10th anniversary of Chris Crocker's "Leave Britney Alone!" video. (It was important.)

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders if 16 years are long enough to let people move beyond taboo images, like those of the jumpers.

  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the young Dreamers, students, who have been left scrambling by the repeal of DACA.

  • The Map Room Blog notes how a Québec plan to name islands in the north created by hydro flooding after literature got complicated by issues of ethnicity and language.

  • Marginal Revolution notes the rise of internal tourism in China, and soon, of Chinese tourists in the wider world.

  • The NYR Daily has an interview arguing that the tendency to make consciousness aphysical or inexplicable is harmful to proper study.

  • Roads and Kingdoms has a brief account of a good experience with Indonesian wine.

  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell links to five reports about Syria. They are grim reading.

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  • Anthrodendum features a guest author talking about the need for artificial intelligence's introduction into our civilization to be managed.

  • Dangerous Minds tells the story of how John Lennon and Yoko Ono met Marshall McLuhan.

  • Cody Delistraty suggests Freud still matters, as a founder and as a pioneer of a new kind of thinking.

  • The Dragon's Gaze reports on cloud circulation patterns of exoplanet HD 80606b.

  • Far Outliers examines just how Chinese immigration to Southeast Asia, particularly Singapore, became so big.

  • Hornet Stories interviews Moises Serrano, one of the many undocumented queer people victims of the repeal of DACA.

  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting some Indian students have math skills which do not translate into the classroom.

  • The NYR Daily looks at the crackdown on free media in Cambodia.

  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at a new set of recommendations for Canada's space future by the Space Advisory Board.

  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Burma, noting the prominence of social media in anti-Rohingya hate.

  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from the Sicilian community of Taormina.

  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang talks about the mystery of some stars which appear to be older than the universe.

  • Window on Eurasia is critical of a Russian proposal for UN peacekeepers in the Donbas making no mention of Russia.

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  • Bad Astronomy's Phil Plait notes how the media made a simulation of a third planet at Gliese 832 a discovery of a new Earth-like world.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly calls on a consideration of why schoolchildren are labelled troublemakers.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes that 51 Eridani b has been discovered to be a cloudy world, and how.

  • Far Outliers notes how the decline of Temasek (the future Singapore) was followed by the rise of Melaka.

  • Hornet Stories tells of an Orthodox Christian priest in Australia, who, at the funeral of a lesbian, called for gays to be shot.

  • Joe. My. God. notes that Catalonia's parliament approved a referendum on secession.

  • The LRB Blog considers the import of Monte Testaccio, a man-made hill of rubble and waste dating from Roman times.

  • The NYR Daily considers the engaging and engaged pop art of Grayson Perry.

  • Roads and Kingdoms tells of a lazy afternoon spent drinking New Zealand beer in a Moscow pub.

  • Towleroad notes an upcoming revealing documentary about Grace Jones.

  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in the Donbas wars, mercenaries are becoming a major, potentially destabilizing force.

  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the conflict between quantitative data and qualitative stories in politics.

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  • CBC reports that the different express bus routes set up by the TTC have had more riders than expected.

  • Steve Munro finds there's much to be concerned about with the way the TTC bought some new electric buses.

  • blogTO notes that the new western extension of the Line 1, into Vaughan, has a set opening date: December 17.

  • The sheer display of TTC fandom displayed by the Athanasopoulos siblings, collectors of transfers, is awesome. The Toronto Star reports.

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  • Centauri Dreams notes one source suggesting red dwarf stars may produce too little ultraviolet to spark life on their planets.

  • Hornet Stories notes how LGBTQ Dreamers will be hit badly by the repeal of DACA.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money approves of Frederick Crews' critical takedown of Freud as a scientist.

  • The LRB Blog looks at a new South Korean film examining the Gwangju massacre of 1980.

  • The NYR Daily notes that China seems set to head into a new era of strict censorship, with calamitous results.

  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the 40th anniversary of the Voyagers in the light of the Pale Blue Dot of Carl Sagan.

  • The Signal reports that, for archivists' purposes, online newspaper sites are actually very poorly organized.

  • At Spacing, Adam Bunch notes how Upper Canadian governor John Simcoe's abolition of slavery was not quite that.

  • Window on Eurasia notes the continued official contortions around Circassian history in Russia.

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