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Eliot's Bookshop, located the intersection of Yonge and Wellesley at 584 Yonge Street. Since my first visit to Toronto in 2002, and long before then for others, Eliot's has been a centrepiece of Toronto's used book market, the three stories of the building being packed with used books of all kinds spilling off their shelves. How sad, then, that rising property taxes on Yonge mean that Eliot's will have to close up shop, the owner of the building and the bookstore hoping to find a more profitable business to take over his lease.

Eliot's Bookshop (1) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books


Eliot's Bookshop (2) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books


Eliot's Bookshop (3) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books


Eliot's Bookshop (4) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books


Eliot's Bookshop (5) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books

Eliot's Bookshop (6) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books


Eliot's Bookshop (7) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books


Eliot's Bookshop (8) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books


Eliot's Bookshop (9) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books


Eliot's Bookshop (10) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books


Eliot's Bookshop (11) #toronto #yongestreet #yongeandwellesley #eliotsbookshop #bookstore #usedbooks #books
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  • Canadian cities could host Amazon's HQ2, but at considerable cost. Affordable housing, say, would be an issue.

  • Conor Sen argues that Amazon's HQ2 augurs an age of corporate diffusion beyond the largest centres.
  • Amazon Prime, Kaleigh Rogers notes, is hugely important for remote communities like those in the North. If it goes ...

  • Stacy Mitchell notes how, after Whole Foods, Amazon seems set to monopolize the whole infrastructure of commerce.

  • Is Jessica Bruder's story of CamperForce, Amazon's RV-living army of elderly workers, a cheering story of triumph over adversity or a scary take on the future of work? I'm not sure.

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  • CBC's Pete Evans notes that Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary, Halifax and Ottawa are all interested in landing Amazon's HQ2.

  • David Rider in the Toronto Star notes that John Tory is pushing forward Toronto as home to Amazon's HQ2, with its 50 thousand jobs.

  • Bloomberg View's Conor Sen notes that Toronto is a strong candidate for Amazon's HQ2, alongside cities like Atlanta and Boston.

  • Also in the Star, David Rider notes that ex-Amazon exec James Thomson is skeptical a crowded Toronto will land HQ2.

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  • At Spacing, John Lorinc is rightly concerned with the impending Doug Ford run for the mayoralty.

  • Spacing takes a look at the futuristic parking garages of mid-20th century Toronto.

  • blogTO looks at the classic department stores of mid-20th century Toronto, at the apogee of this retail model.

  • This Toronto Star feature on the plight of temp workers in Toronto is upsetting. Is this the future we have made?

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  • Doug Ford is running for mayor in 2018, hoping to continue Rob's legacy. (Doug was the more functional of the two.)

  • Toronto has cracked down successfully on a property owner in Cabbagetown using their buildings for Airbnb.

  • The Lower Don Trail is scheduled to reopen later this month, one year later than originally scheduled.

  • The LCBO will be the authorized seller of marijuana in Ontario. I think I largely support this: regulation matters.

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  • James Bow writes about the latest computer purchase he has made.

  • Far Outliers notes the scarily minimalist goals of the American occupation in early post-war Japan.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that The Nation is not exactly covering itself in glory with its pro-Putin coverage of late.

  • Drew Rowsome quite likes the new musical endeavours of Adore Delano.

  • Starts With A Bang's Ethan Siegel notes how stars--and which stars--make elements heavier than iron.

  • Transit Toronto notes the impending partial resumption of streetcar service on Queen Street.

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  • blogTO notes that the former location of Pages on Queen Street West finally has a new tenant, a housewares store.

  • Margaret Atwood's opposition to a Davenport Road condo development made headlines.
  • Christopher Hume in the Toronto Star makes the point that Toronto needs more midrise housing.

  • Global News reports the sad news that Toronto chief planner Jennifer Keesmaat has resigned.

  • Toronto Life describes how a lucky young couple in their 20s found an affordable apartment downtown, on Yonge, even!

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  • blogTO notes the new name of Toronto's Regent Park, "DuEast", after Dundas Street East.

  • In the Toronto Star, Shawn Micallef argues a recent festival shows the potential of east-end high-rise neighbourhood Main Square.

  • Also in the Star, Francine Kopun looks at the half-billion dollars put into renovating Sherway Gardens.

  • Ainslie Cruickshank reports on how the many who care for late councilor Pam McConnell are mourning her.

  • In The Globe and Mail, Miriam Katawazi reports on finds from remarkable, long-delayed inventory of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.

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  • Worrying about the relationship of Toronto and nuclear weapons seems very 1980s. What's old is new again, as noted at NOW Toronto.

  • Steve Munro points out that talk of a fare freeze on the TTC ignores the underlying economics. Who, and what, will pay for this?

  • It's nice that the Little Free Pantry is being supported, as Global News observes, but what does it say about our city that this is a thing?

  • Clifton Joseph notes the Toronto Caribbean Festival has never achieved its goals of emancipation. Cue Bakhtin ...

  • Global News notes the new Drake music video promoting his OVO Fest store at Yorkdale. I should go.

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The new Food Basics store at 805 Lansdowne Avenue, on the corner with Dupont Street, is a perfectly serviceable grocery store, with neat displays and floors of polished concrete and even an escalator connecting the store to the adjacent Fuse Condos.

Entering


Produce


Aisle


Frozen food


Escalator
rfmcdonald: (photo)
One of the first places I visited in Charlottetown after waking up was that city's new Giant Tiger store, located in a strip mall--courtyard, really--at 449 University Avenue. I was curious to see this new discount retailer, not least because there are no Giant Tigers in downtown Toronto. (The closest the store locator lists to me is on Kipling Avenue in Etobicoke.)

This Giant Tiger had only been open for a week by the time I saw it, so the Charlottetown location still had the new-store sheen to it. This location did seem well-designed, funneling shopping through women's clothing through foodstuffs down through men's clothing and sundries, with reasonable merchandise. It looks like a useful addition to the retail landscape, a decided step up from Dollarama with its higher-end items like clothes, perhaps even a first approximation towards a replacement for departed chain stores like Zellers. I'm only surprised that there is not a Giant Tiger yet in downtown Toronto: Giant Tiger could do well, I am sure, if only it had the right location.

<center><a data-flickr-embed=" true"="true"" href="http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/giant-tiger-roars-into-charlottetown-pei-634462183.htmlopen for a week</u></a> by the time I saw it, so the Charlottetown location still had the new-store sheen to it. It looks like a useful addition to the retail landscape, a decided step up from Dollarama with its higher-end items like clothes, perhaps even a first approximation towards a replacement for departed chain stores like Zellers. I'm only surprised that there is not a Giant Tiger yet in downtown Toronto: it could do well, I am sure, if only it had the right location.

<center><a data-flickr-embed=" title="Giant Tiger, grocery section">Giant Tiger, grocery section

Giant Tiger's, women's clothes section


Giant Tiger, towards the canned goods


Line-up at the cash
rfmcdonald: (photo)
Some likes I received on year-old photos on Instagram tagged with Toronto's Geary Avenue, a west-east street that lies literally on the other side of the tracks from my home on Dupont, alerted me to the Geary Ave. Flea. This flea market event, held at and around the corner of Geary and Westmoreland Avenue, is a monthly event, today's being the second of four scheduled for the summmer, on the last Sunday of each month.

What did I think of the Geary Ave. Flea? I enjoyed it. There's a nice mix of local businesspeople and shopkeepers advertising their goods, people trying to sell bricabrac in good shape, and even a mix of food and drink vendors. It's a nice addition to the neighbourhood. I just wish there were more iterations scheduled for this summer.

Entering the Geary Ave. Flea off Westmoreland


Bricabrac


5 records for $20


Jerseys and hats for sale


Flowers arranged


Things to drink


On Westmoreland


Looking back


Sign on Dovercourt
rfmcdonald: (photo)
Coffee Time by the towers (and Food Basics) #toronto #dupontstreet #wallaceemerson #coffeetime #foodbasics #condos #towers


I stopped off at the Coffee Time on the northeast corner of Dupont and Lansdowne this afternoon en route to Big on Bloor Festival, picking up a jumbo coffee and a beef samosa before I veered south onto Lansdowne towards Bloordale. I blogged about this restaurant and its (to my mind) unfairly grim reputation. (My Flickr link is here.) This time, as I approached the restaurant from the east, I saw the Food Basics grocery store lying just to the west, I thought about the controversy around this store and its neighbourhood.

This Food Basics is an anchor store for the Fuse Condos development, on the northwest of Dupont and Lansdowne. This new grocery store opening was welcome by some, who saw no reason this store could not co-exist with the FreshCo in the Galleria Mall just a few minutes east at Dupont and Dufferin. To some, this was a betrayal: Fuse Condos had produced a Metro grocery store, a higher-end grocery store with more selection, and some buyers were quite upset. There was even a petition calling for a Metro.

All this was satirized in The Beaverton, and aptly analyzed in the Toronto Star by Edward Keenan. Keenan pointed out that this behaviour was wildly out of place given the decidedly working-class nature of Wallace Emerson. Food Basics, obviously, got installed regardless.

Still: how long will this neighbourhood, this cluster of west-end neighbourhoods, remain what it has been? I wonder.
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  • James Bow talks about how Ontario aiming for experimental hydrogen-powered trains, not electric ones, is a mistake.

  • Marginal Revolution reports on the community that WalMart took to a West Virginia county it is now leaving.

  • Diane Duane shows an old novel proposal from 1999 that she found again, and is now dusting off.

  • Transit Toronto notes that the time-based transfer program on the St. Clair route is ending, after 12 years.

  • Unicorn Booty reports on the lavender scare of the 1950s in the United States.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the strong use of repetition, as a literary device, in the Hebrew version particularly of Genesis.

  • Window on Eurasia wonders how the Russian-American relationship, one Russia has depended on in the past, will evolve.

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Toronto's West Queen West, along Queen Street West to the west of Bathurst, is home to many small indie fashion stores. Late at night, the front windows of stores like Mericani (630A Queen Street West), WTFash (632 Queen Street West), and The Store on Queen (662 Queen Street West), look almost like art gallery displays.

West Queen West fashion (1) #toronto #queenstreetwest #westqueenwest #queerstreetwest #fashion


West Queen West fashion (2) #toronto #queenstreetwest #westqueenwest #queerstreetwest #fashion


West Queen West fashion (3)  #toronto #queenstreetwest #westqueenwest #queerstreetwest #fashion
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After seven years of vacancy, the Maple Leaf Gardens building on Church and Carlton that had once housed the home area of the Toronto Maple Leafs became a Loblaws grocery store in 2011. Because of its size and its storied location, Loblaws 60 Carlton is arguably one of the chain's flagship stores. Because of its location on Church Street, Carlton Street in fact being one of several possible southern termini of Church and Wellesley, the store's merchandise is also regularly tricked out in the rainbow colours of Pride when this season comes about.

Loblaws rainbow (1)


Loblaws rainbow (2)


Loblaws rainbow (3)


Loblaws rainbow (4)
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  • The Big Picture shares shocking photos of the Portuguese forest fires.

  • blogTO notes that, happily, Seaton Village's Fiesta Farms is apparently not at risk of being turned into a condo development site.

  • Centauri Dreams notes a new starship discussion group in Delft. Shades of the British Interplanetary Society and the Daedalus?

  • D-Brief considers a new theory explaining why different birds' eggs have different shapes.

  • The Frailest Thing's Michael Sacasas commits himself to a new regimen of blogging about technology and its imports. (There is a Patreon.)

  • Language Hat notes the current Turkish government's interest in purging Turkish of Western loanwords.

  • Language Log's Victor Mair sums up the evidence for the diffusion of Indo-European languages, and their speakers, into India.

  • The LRB Blog notes the Theresa May government's inability post-Grenfell to communicate with any sense of emotion.

  • Marginal Revolution's Tyler Cowen wonders if the alt-right more prominent in the Anglophone world because it is more prone to the appeal of the new.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw wonders if Brexit will result in a stronger European Union and a weaker United Kingdom.

  • Seriously Science reports a study suggesting that shiny new headphones are not better than less flashy brands.

  • Torontoist reports on the anti-Muslim hate groups set to march in Toronto Pride.

  • Understanding Society considers the subject of critical realism in sociological analyses.

  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia's call to promote Cyrillic across the former Soviet Union has gone badly in Armenia, with its own script.

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  • blogTO notes that the old HMV store in the Dufferin Mall is now a fidget spinner store. This has gone viral.
  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly talks about her week in Paris.

  • Centauri Dreams notes one paper examining the complex formation of the dense TRAPPIST-1 system.

  • Far Outliers reports from early 20th century Albania, about how tribal and language and ethnic identities overlap, and not.

  • Language Log notes efforts to promote Cantonese in the face of Mandarin.

  • The LRB Blog wonders if May's electoral defeat might lead to the United Kingdom changing its Brexit trajectory.

  • Marginal Revolution notes that cars have more complex computer programming these days than fighter jets.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer notes that the counter-cyclical Brazilian fiscal cap still makes no sense.

  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is edging towards an acknowledgement of its involvement in the Ukrainian war.

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Bloomberg's Lucas Shaw notes that although Spotify is not yet profitable, it has managed to accumulate quite a few subscribers. Will this be enough to let it last?

Spotify has surpassed 50 million subscribers, extending its lead over rivals Apple Music, SoundCloud and Google as the world’s largest paid music streaming service.

The service, owned by Stockholm-based Spotify Ltd., has been growing at a breakneck pace. The company said it had 30 million subscribers less than a year ago, and 40 million subscribers in September. Apple Inc., owner of the second-largest paid service, said last month its streaming service has more than 20 million customers.

Adding paying customers will help Spotify pitch investors, who expect the company to file for an initial public offering and are looking for signs the company can convert its growing subscriber base into a sustainable business. Spotify, which is unprofitable, generates almost all of its sales from subscriptions, though the music service also has tens of millions of additional users who listen for free, supported by advertising.
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I am glad that, as reported in David Friend's Canadian Press article at the Toronto Star, there might be some kind of music retailer in Canada, at least for a time.

Sunrise Records is placing a major bet on Canadian music sales with plans to move into 70 retail spaces being vacated by HMV Canada.

The Ontario-based music retail chain has negotiated new leases with mall landlords across the country.

Sunrise’s expansion gives the company a quick foothold in the Canadian music scene just as the industry’s largest retailer closes shop. Stores will begin to open this spring after HMV liquidates and removes its signs.

“It’s a good opportunity for us to get a lot more stores open,” Sunrise Records president Doug Putman told The Canadian Press in an interview.

“We think there needs to be a great outlet across Canada to buy music.”

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