rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Bloomberg notes that the people and businesses leaving London for the EU-27 will enjoy lower rents.

  • DW reports on potential British interest in joining NAFTA, if Brexit talks with the EU collapse entirely.

  • The remarkable Bombardier deal with Airbus may yet save the Canadian company from American tariffs. Global News reports.

  • Global News takes a look at the provinces and economic sectors in Canada to be hit hardest by the end of NAFTA.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • The Muse song "Neutron Star Collision" went through my head when I heard the news.

  • This Guardian article went into great detail about th
  • You can tell that Bad Astronomer Phil Plait really enjoyed writing about the neutron star collision in NGC 4993.

  • D-Brief notes that Einstein doubted the existence of gravitational waves, ever mind their detectability, and looks at the way GW170817 helped nail down the Hubble constant, measuring the rate the universe expands.

  • Starts With A Bang's Ethan Siegel provides a nice overview of GW170817.

  • Sophia Chen's Wired article takes an interesting look at the culture of gravitational wave astronomy, traditionally secretive for fear of criticism.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • The failure to repair the railway linking Churchill to the rest of Canada is going to have huge consequences. CBC reports.

  • With relatively green hydro energy, Hydro-Quebec is set to become a major exporter of power to the US. The Globe and Mail reports.

  • The old lands of Mr. Christie to Mimico, in south Etobicoke, is set to become a new condo-heavy Liberty Village. Torontoist reports.

  • Christopher Hume does not at all like the idea of just giving a bit chunk of the Port Lands to the movie industry. He writes in the Toronto Star.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • I bet that, as numerous reports have indicated, LIGO picked up a neutron star collision, with EM traces. D-Brief reports.

  • Neanderthal genes seem to have had a big influence on modern human health. I would be surprised not to have some. National Geographic describes.

  • Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go may evoke crises of bioethics, but I'm not sure it relates to genetic engineering. VICE reports.

  • These apocalyptic visions of technophiles who want to create an artificial intelligence to become god are notable. The Guardian takes a look.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • VICE suggests that drag in Brooklyn is having a big creative moment.

  • This interview with the director of the Tom of Finland biopic sounds like he has grasped the issues.

  • LiveScience tells of a formal study suggesting heterosexual guys prefer bromances to straight relationships ... huh.

  • Does online dating have the ability to transform society, by making all kinds of unexpected links across boundaries? Technology Review reports.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Hornet Stories looks at the long history of the explicitly LGBTQ-friendly Metropolitan Community Church.

  • Jeff Rock will be the new pastor of Toronto's Metropolitan Community Church congregation, after Brent Hawkes. The Toronto Star reports.

  • Quartz reports on a PFLAG China cruise, featuring queer people and their parents.

  • Little India reports on the emerging field of gay literature in India, prose and poetry, fiction and non-fiction.

  • The Satanic Temple of Seattle is commissioning anti-gay bakers to bake them pro-Satanism cakes. Religious freedom, right? Bustle tells the story.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • The way art helped build a stronger community in Parkdale is the subject of this NOW Toronto article.

  • The AGO has just landed a new curator of indigenous art, Anishinabe-kwe artist Wanda Nanibush.

  • Transitions Online notes how, under Communism, different Balkan peoples kept looking to a different west for entertainment.

  • MacLean's looks at the history of Canadian Thanksgiving.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Wired mourns AIM, AOL Instant Messenger. For me as with others, it really was a life-changing technology.

  • The Ring of Fire, a mineral-rich region of northern Ontario set for development, is getting high-speed Internet. The Toronto Star reports.
  • \
  • VICE notes that someone programmed an Arduino robot with a simulation of a worm's brain. This is very interesting.

  • The Crux considers the potential import of an orbital Moon station for future interplanetary travel.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • This article looks at the amazing queer parties that were major nightlife features in the 1930s US. The Guardian reports.


  • City News looks at how drag queens are becoming high-demand performers in RuPaul-era Toronto.

  • Ruth La Ferla shares a stunning contemporary photo exhibit by Michael Sharkey of the fashion of out queer youths. The New York Times reports.

  • A new gay-themed novel by Matt Cain is going to get crowdfunded after being rejected by traditional publisher as "too gay". The Guardian reports.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Lake Erie, National Geographic notes, is experiencing regular massive algae blooms.

  • Adria Vasil talks about her experience taking part in the recent Great Lakes Water Walk, over at NOW Toronto.

  • Atlas Obscura has more about that drone-harvested field of barley in England.

  • The early Earth got much less carbon than it might have been expected to from the early solar system. Universe Today reports.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Hundreds of parrots in a Surrey sanctuary are still waiting for permanent homes. Global News reports.

  • NPR reports on how many Uighurs in China find success through their racially mixed appearances, as models.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer explains the rationale behind the Jones Act, with its stiff shipping charges for Puerto Rico.

  • The Chinese Buddhist fangsheng ritual, involving the release of captured animals into the wild, has issues. The Guardian reports.

  • Tyson Yunkaporta's essay takes a look at the appeal of SF/F, and post-apocalyptic fiction, for indigenous peoples.

rfmcdonald: (Default)
rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Universe Today reports on the potential game-changing nature of a hyperloop connecting Toronto and Montréal.

  • Hacking of the brain is an obvious risk of two-way brain/Internet interfaces. From VICE.

  • Puerto Rico's ongoing economic crisis has only been worsened by Hurricane Maria. Bloomberg reports.

  • The problem with the German economy, strong as it may be now, is that not enough has been invested in the future. Bloomberg warns.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Neanderthals, like contemporary humans, had the sort of prolonged childhoods which lend themselves to intelligence. National Geographic reports.

  • The cool chill water of oceans is starting to be used to cool data centres. VICE reports.

  • Brazil is set to embark on a substantial process to restore Amazonian rainforest. VICE reports.

  • The Dawn probe found evidence of subsurface ice on rocky asteroid-belt protoplanet Vesta. Universe Today reports.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • A Canadian proposal at the NAFTA negotiations to liberalize migration across borders got shot down by the US.

  • Latin American governments have recently called for a radical liberalization of migration law worldwide.

  • Canada is in a potential position to take advantage of the DREAMers, if they are forced to leave.

  • Québec premier Philippe Couillard wants to encourage Anglos to move back to the province. Global News reports.

  • The resettlement of LGBTQ refugees is especially complicated. VICE reports.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • CBC notes that the Yonge and Dundas street artist scene is closing down under city regulations, including permits.

  • Emily Mathieu talks about how she conducts her journalism with some of Toronto's most marginalized as subjects.

  • The Globe and Mail notes the local controversy over having police officers permanently stationed in schools.

  • The idea that police who actively undermine the Special Investigations Unit should be seriously punished seems obvious.
  • Veteran NDP politican and LGBTQ rights advocate Cheri DiNovo is leaving politics to become a minister in church.

  • Finally, the Dundas West TTC station will be connected to the GO Transit hub less than 300 metres away!

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Climate change is making the famous tea of Darjeeling much more difficult to come by. VICE reports.

  • Wired notes Fitbits are useful tracking devices for scientists engaged in studies, too. (I always wear mine.)

  • I entirely approve of this new Niagara College program. Why not legalize and professionalize cannabis agriculture?

  • This VICE interview with bringing the Truvada needed for inexpensive PrEP across the border into Canada is of note.

  • A new study suggests that Planet Nine, if it exists, was likely not captured by the young sun but formed here. Universe Today reports.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Bad Astronomy's Phil Plait notes the continuing maps and naming of the Pluto system.

  • Centauri Dreams considers one method to detect photosynthesis on Earth-like worlds of red dwarf stars.

  • D-Brief notes the discovery of Octlantis, a permanent community of octopi located off the coast of Australia.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes Earth-like world can co-exist with a Jovian in a circumstellar habitable zone.

  • Hornet Stories notes that Morrissey is now in Twitter. (This will not go well.

  • Language Log notes the kanji tattoo of one American neo-Nazi.

  • The LRB Blog notes how the English town of Tewksbury is still recovering from massive flooding a decade later.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the improbable life of Barry Sadler, he of "The Ballad of the Green Berets".

  • The Map Room Blog shares this terrifying map examining the rain footprint of Hurricane Irma.

  • Spacing reviews a fascinating dual biography of architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Philip Johnson.

  • Window on Eurasia notes an call to restore to maps the old Chinese name for former Chinese Tuva, Uryankhai.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • Naomi Klein argues that this summer, of wildfires and disasters, marks an environmental turning point.

  • National Geographic shares stunning video of defrosting Tibetan soil flowing.

  • This dumping of illegally harvested lobsters as garbage on land in Nova Scotia is a terrible waste. CBC reports.

  • Can we limit urban flooding only if we force landowners to contribute to the costs of stormwater infrastructure? MacLean's makes the case.

rfmcdonald: (Default)

  • MacLean's argues that, in Canada and arguably the West generally, it is much too soon to rehabilitate the swastika.

  • Global News reports on a proposal to rename Nova Scotia's Cornwallis River.

  • This effort to engage in a minimalist, non-misleading restoration of a Spanish castle is controversial.

  • The argument that human history goes back millions of years, and encompass a huger area than thought, is compelling.

Profile

rfmcdonald: (Default)rfmcdonald

October 2017

S M T W T F S
12 3 4 5 6 7
89 101112 13 14
15 16 17181920 21
22232425262728
293031    

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Page Summary

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Oct. 22nd, 2017 01:30 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios