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  • In a NOW Toronto cover feature, Rob Downie profiles 1960s trans R&B Toronto star Jackie Shane as she stages a late comeback.

  • Elio Ianucci at The Globe and Mail profiles Jackie Shane's biography and (continuing!) history in Toronto.

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  • CBC takes a look at the different Canadian cities which applied to become Amazon's next headquarters.

  • The National Post reports on the unlikely bid of Sault Sainte Marie for Amazon's HQ2.

  • The New York Times shares an argument that Amazon contributed to spiraling inequality in Seattle.

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  • The area of Humber River Bay may yet be radically transformed by the development of the vast Christie's site. The Globe and Mail reports.

  • Torontoist notes how the City of Toronto is starting to let apartment dwellers know if they might die in a disastrous fire like Grenfell.

  • Wired reports on the vast Google plan to make not just Quayside but the entire waterfront a high-tech prototype.

  • TVO's John Michael McGrath argues that the city does not need Google to design good neighbourhoods.

  • Apparently many people are escaping the Toronto affordable housing crisis by moving into vans. The Toronto Star reports.

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  • The scale of the changes impending for Bloor and Dundas is, literally, immense. blogTO reports.

  • Alas, the venerable Green Room hidden behind Bloor and Brunswick is set to leave its abode. blogTO reports.

  • I love this proposal at Spacing by Michael McClelland for an archeology park in storied downtown Toronto.

  • I agree with Simon Bredin at Torontoist that it would be a shame for Torontonians to losing public access to the Hearn Generating Station.

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  • These Forest Hill homeowners' claim that renovating neighbours stole their intellectual property seem silly to me. The Toronto Star reports.

  • Shawn Micallef notes that the traditional architecture style of Toronto is of one pastiche or another. Maybe modernism especially?

  • Toronto Life shares photos of a beautiful waterfront home in the Beaches, one I have passed by frequently. Only $6 million!

  • Ellen Scheinberg of Spacing tells how detective work tracked down the house that was subject of Lawren Harris' "Toronto House".

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  • The failure to repair the railway linking Churchill to the rest of Canada is going to have huge consequences. CBC reports.

  • With relatively green hydro energy, Hydro-Quebec is set to become a major exporter of power to the US. The Globe and Mail reports.

  • The old lands of Mr. Christie to Mimico, in south Etobicoke, is set to become a new condo-heavy Liberty Village. Torontoist reports.

  • Christopher Hume does not at all like the idea of just giving a bit chunk of the Port Lands to the movie industry. He writes in the Toronto Star.

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  • Spacing's John Lorinc considers confusion over what the idea of "mixed-use" development on the waterfront is.

  • Dave Leblanc looks at the PATH, the underground tunnels in downtown Toronto making up a huge mall. It counts. The Globe and Mail reports.

  • It turns out that the #worldslargestrubberduck was actually really good for waterfront businesses. The Toronto Star reports.

  • Toronto Life interviews RioCan head Jonathan Gitlin, who thinks rent control will be terrible for renters.

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  • blogTO looks at the mirrors being scattered across the University of Toronto campus downtown. (Art.)

  • blogTO notes that old Toronto street signs are going up for sale.

  • Abandoned silos across Toronto are being refurbished for a variety of purposes. blogTO reports.

  • This blogTO photo essay about the vestiges of abandoned streets and related infrastructure across Toronto is evocative.

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  • Alex Bozikovic looks at the plans for 1 Bloor Street West, The One. This tower may well become a national icon.

  • Will a Google company play a leading role in the construction of the east waterfront neighbourhood of Quayside? The Toronto Star reports.

  • The idea of the Parkdale library becoming the centre of a bigger cultural hub is provocative. NOW Toronto reports.

  • This art show at York featuring works by artists from the old internal suburbs of Toronto sounds great. The Globe and Mail reports.

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  • The National Post notes that Toronto city council voted against naming a stadium after the late Rob Ford.

  • blogTO notes that Humber Bay Shores wants to run a private neighbourhood bus service, for want of a TTC presence.

  • Andrew Hunter, former Canadian curator at the AGO, calls for a decolonization of art galleries across Canada.

  • Joanna Lavoie describes the concrete sculptures of Duane Linklater newly installed across the Don valley.

  • At Torontoist, Dennis Duffy reports on the 19th century criminal gangs once populating the Don Valley. Seriously.

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  • A new report suggests that, in Toronto, you need to learn at least twice minimum wage in order to thrive. The Toronto Star reports.

  • GO Transit users will apparently get half-price TTC fares. The Toronto Star reports.

  • From the former Stollery's, at 1 Bloor Street West, will rise Toronto's tallest condo tower. The Globe and Mail reports.

  • Torontoist shares an opinion piece looking at the infrastructure of environmental protection in the GTHA.

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  • Kevin Ritchie noted in NOW Toronto that this Nuit Blanche will be dominated by the theme of protest and revolution.

  • Chris Rattan talks with different curators and artists about what public art in Toronto should aim to do.

  • NOW Toronto lists its top ten exhibits for Nuit Blanche.

  • Toronto Life lists some cool places to visit for Nuit Blanche.

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  • There will be huge changes at Bloor and Dufferin, including one proposed tower a few dozen stories high. blogTO reports.

  • The St. Regis, the former Trump Tower, is set to offer very high-end luxury condos in the Financial District. The Toronto Star reports.

  • In the aftermath of a string of pedestrian deaths, Shawn Micallef notes the design failures of Toronto leading to loss of life.

  • Spacing talks about what the North Market of Toronto can learn from the historic El Born of Barcelona.

  • blogTO notes that an abortive scandal over the placement of a Little Free Library came to nothing in the end.

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  • Politics in a small Newfoundland community seem to literally be a family matter, of Crockers and Blakes. The National Post reports.

  • Goldfish are taking over the water systems of the Alberta city of St. Albert's. The National Post reports.

  • This BBC feature looks at the lives of the inhabitants, survivors and not, of the 21st floor of Grenfell.

  • This Guardian feature looks at ways cities can protect themselves against disaster, especially with water.

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  • blogTO notes that video rental store Videoflicks, on Avenue Road, is set to close down.

  • The TTC, blogTO notes, has begun "ghost service" on its half-dozen new subway stations.

  • Edward Keenan thinks that we may as well name a football stadium after Rob Ford. Why not? If it makes Ford Nation feel better ...

  • Spacing Toronto features John Lorinc looking at how community parks organizations, like at Ramsden, can exclude outsiders.

  • VICE notes on recent study suggesting the real estate market of Toronto is the most overvalued of world cities.

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  • A new TD report suggests the introduction of a $15 minimum wage could cost up to 90 thousand jobs by 2020, especially if the shift is too quick. Global News reports.

  • Torontoist notes the ongoing debate over what to do with the land suggested for Rail Deck Park. (I prefer the park.)

  • blogTO notes the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough is set to expand and move to a new location.

  • Opposition--ill-grounded opposition, I would say--to a new wind energy project in Prince Edward County is growing. Global News reports.

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  • The Ontario government is not backing down on rent control despite impending conversions of real estate to condos.

  • blogTO notes this last heat wave has made the Toronto Islands superb, at last. I visited Sunday--visit while you can.

  • The 401 Richmond arts centre is getting tax relief, letting it function as a home for culture in a booming downtown.

  • Christopher Hume argues amalgamation, by undermining old power structures, made progress in Toronto impossible.

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  • The mixture of high- and low-end real estate on High Park Avenue might be a model for Toronto. Tess Kalinowski reports.

  • There are quite a few different proposals for replacements of the streetcar linking Union Station to Queens Quay.

  • Edward Keenan argues that, however Union Station or Queens Quay are linked, the link should be funded adequately.

  • The Globe and Mail reports on how the arrival of rent control is leading to the early conversion of rental units to condos.

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  • Having visited Friday, I liked the blogTO report on the early days of Toronto's love affair with Niagara Falls.

  • blogTO shares photos of Kensington Market in the raw 1970s.

  • The exterior of 450 Pape Avenue was used for the movie It, and the place is seeing Stephen King pilgrims already.

  • The Toronto Book Garden, a lovely mini-park at Harbourfront keyed to literary Toronto, opened yesterday.

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  • Centauri Dreams links to archival video painstakingly collected from the Voyager missions.

  • Citizen Science Salon notes ways ordinary people can use satellite imagery for archaeological purposes.

  • Good news: Asian carp can't find a fin-hold in Lake Michigan. Bad news: The lake is so food-deprived nothing lives there. The Crux reports.

  • D-Brief notes that, once every second, a fast radio burst occurs somewhere in the universe.

  • Dangerous Minds looks at the psychedelic retro-futurism of Swedish artist Kilian Eng.

  • Dead Things notes the recovery of ancient human DNA from some African sites, and what this could mean for study.

  • Cody Delistraty reconsiders the idea of the "coming of age" narrative. Does this make sense now that we have abandoned the idea of a unitary self?

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper examining the evolution of icy bodies around different post-main sequence stars.

  • The Great Grey Bridge's Philip Turner notes anti-Putin dissident Alexei Navalny.

  • Hornet Stories notes reports of anti-gay persecution in Azerbaijan.

  • Language Log takes a look at the dialectal variations of southern Ohio.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money starts a discussion about what effective disaster relief for Puerto Rico would look like.

  • The LRB Blog looks at the aftermath of the recent earthquake in Mexico, and the story of the buried girl who was not there.

  • Marginal Revolution notes that Toronto real estate companies, in light of rent control, are switching rental units over to condos.

  • Naked Anthropologist Laura Agustín takes a look at the origins and stories of migrant sex workers.

  • The NYR Daily talks about the supposedly unthinkable idea of nuclear war in the age of Trump.

  • Drew Rowsome gives a strongly positive--and deserved review to the Minmar Gaslight show The Seat Next to the King, a Fringe triumph now playing at the Theatre Centre.

  • Starts With A Bang's Ethan Siegel explains how so many outer-system icy worlds have liquid water.

  • Towleroad features Jim Parsons' exploration of how important is for him, as a gay man, to be married.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russian language policy limiting minority languages in education could backfire, and wonders if Islamization one way people in an urbanizing North Caucasus are trying to remain connected to community.

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