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  • Bloomberg notes that the people and businesses leaving London for the EU-27 will enjoy lower rents.

  • DW reports on potential British interest in joining NAFTA, if Brexit talks with the EU collapse entirely.

  • The remarkable Bombardier deal with Airbus may yet save the Canadian company from American tariffs. Global News reports.

  • Global News takes a look at the provinces and economic sectors in Canada to be hit hardest by the end of NAFTA.

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  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper suggesting exoplanet transits could start a galactic communications network.

  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the connections between eating and identity.

  • The Frailest Thing's Michael Sacasas looks at the need for a critical study of the relationship between technology and democracy.

  • Language Hat notes how nationalism split Hindustani into separate Hindi and Urdu languages.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reflects on the grim outlook in Somalia after the terrible recent Mogadishu bombing.

  • Marginal Revolution's Tyler Cowen thinks Trump's decertification of the Iran deal is a bad idea.

  • The Map Room Blog links to an article imagining a counter-mapping of the Amazon by indigenous peoples.

  • Neuroskeptic considers the possibility of Parkinson's being a prion disease, somewhat like mad cow disease.

  • The NYR Daily notes that a Brexit driven by a perceived need to take back control will not meet that need, at all.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw looks at the problem Sydney faces as it booms.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer looks at the extent to which an independent Catalonia would be ravaged economically by a non-negotiated secession.

  • Peter Watts tells the sad story of an encounter between Toronto police and a homeless man he knows.

  • Window on Eurasia notes a Sakhalin bridge, like a Crimea bridge, may not come off because of Russian weakness.

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  • Spacing's John Lorinc considers confusion over what the idea of "mixed-use" development on the waterfront is.

  • Dave Leblanc looks at the PATH, the underground tunnels in downtown Toronto making up a huge mall. It counts. The Globe and Mail reports.

  • It turns out that the #worldslargestrubberduck was actually really good for waterfront businesses. The Toronto Star reports.

  • Toronto Life interviews RioCan head Jonathan Gitlin, who thinks rent control will be terrible for renters.

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Bad Astronomer Phil Plait talks about the discovery that the early Moon had a notable atmosphere. http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/air-de-lune

The Big Picture, from the Boston Globe, shares terrifying pictures from the California wildfires. https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/bigpicture/2017/10/10/raging-wildfires-california/GtkTUeIILcZeqp5jlsLTMI/story.html

The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly talks about how writers need editing, and editors. https://broadsideblog.wordpress.com/2017/10/14/why-editors-matter-more-than-ever/

D-Brief notes that forming coal beds sucked so much carbon dioxide out of the air that it triggered an ice age.
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2017/10/10/coal-earth-ice/

Dangerous Minds looks at Michael's Thing, a vintage guide to gay New York dating from the 1970s. http://dangerousminds.net/comments/michaels_thing_new_york_citys_once_essential_queer_city_guide

Cody Delistraty looks at a new Paris exhibition of the works of Paul Gauguin that tries to deal with his moral sketchiness, inspiration of much his work. https://delistraty.com/2017/10/09/paul-gauguins-insurmountable-immorality/

Hornet Stories notes that same same-sex-attracted guys opt to be called not gay but androphiles. (Less baggage, they say.) https://hornetapp.com/stories/men-who-love-men-androphile/

Language Hat notes a claim that the Spanish of Christopher Columbus was marked by Catalan. http://languagehat.com/columbuss-catalan/

Language Log notes that the languages of southern China like Cantonese are actually fully-fledged languages. http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=34933

Lawyers, Guns and Money notes an argument that Chinese companies do not abide by the terms of tech transfer agreements.
http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2017/10/tech-transfer

The LRB Blog notes an old Mike Davis article noting how California, at a time of climate change, risks catastrophic wildfires. https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2017/10/10/the-editors/california-burning/

The Map Room Blog is unimpressed by the new book, A History of Canada in Ten Maps. (It needs more maps. Seriously.) https://buff.ly/2gcdLKG

The NYR Daily takes another look at the nature of consciousness.
http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2017/10/09/consciousness-an-object-lesson/

The Planetary Society Blog shares a scientist's story about how he stitched together the last mosaic photo of Saturn by Cassini. http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2017/cassinis-last-dance-with-saturn-farewell-mosaic.html

The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer notes that an unnegotiated secession of Catalonia from Spain would be a catastrophe for the new country. http://noelmaurer.typepad.com/aab/2017/10/la-econom%C3%ADa-de-la-secesi%C3%B3n-en-la-madre-patria.html

Roads and Kingdoms considers what is next for Kurdistan after its independence referendum. http://roadsandkingdoms.com/2017/whats-next-for-kurdistan/

Science Sushi considers the sketchy science of studying cetacean sex. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/science-sushi/2017/10/10/dolphin-penis-vagina-simulated-marine-mammal-sex/

Starts With A Bang's Ethan Siegel notes that exceptionally strong evidence that we do, in fact, exist in a real multiverse. https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2017/10/12/the-multiverse-is-inevitable-and-were-living-in-it/

Strange Maps looks at rates of reported corruption across Latin America, finding that Mexico fares badly. http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/half-of-all-mexicans-paid-a-bribe-in-the-previous-12-months

Window on Eurasia notes new inflows of migrants to Russia include fewer Europeans and many more Central Asians. http://windowoneurasia2.blogspot.ca/2017/10/gastarbeiters-in-russia-from-central.html
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  • DNA tests of Beothuk remains reveal that the extinct group was related to neither Mi'kmaq nor Inuit. The Globe and Mail reports.

  • Some Newfoundland outports are seeing many young professionals move in, to make homes and businesses. CBC reports.

  • Marginal Revolution claims a group wanting to mount a seasteading effort off French Polynesia are getting close to their goals.

  • Politico.eu notes that, in the Shetlands, while fishers hope Brexit will lead to the revival of the fisheries others fear a labour shortage without EU-27 migrants.

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  • A new report suggests that, in Toronto, you need to learn at least twice minimum wage in order to thrive. The Toronto Star reports.

  • GO Transit users will apparently get half-price TTC fares. The Toronto Star reports.

  • From the former Stollery's, at 1 Bloor Street West, will rise Toronto's tallest condo tower. The Globe and Mail reports.

  • Torontoist shares an opinion piece looking at the infrastructure of environmental protection in the GTHA.

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  • Hundreds of parrots in a Surrey sanctuary are still waiting for permanent homes. Global News reports.

  • NPR reports on how many Uighurs in China find success through their racially mixed appearances, as models.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer explains the rationale behind the Jones Act, with its stiff shipping charges for Puerto Rico.

  • The Chinese Buddhist fangsheng ritual, involving the release of captured animals into the wild, has issues. The Guardian reports.

  • Tyson Yunkaporta's essay takes a look at the appeal of SF/F, and post-apocalyptic fiction, for indigenous peoples.

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  • blogTO notes that video rental store Videoflicks, on Avenue Road, is set to close down.

  • The TTC, blogTO notes, has begun "ghost service" on its half-dozen new subway stations.

  • Edward Keenan thinks that we may as well name a football stadium after Rob Ford. Why not? If it makes Ford Nation feel better ...

  • Spacing Toronto features John Lorinc looking at how community parks organizations, like at Ramsden, can exclude outsiders.

  • VICE notes on recent study suggesting the real estate market of Toronto is the most overvalued of world cities.

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  • A new TD report suggests the introduction of a $15 minimum wage could cost up to 90 thousand jobs by 2020, especially if the shift is too quick. Global News reports.

  • Torontoist notes the ongoing debate over what to do with the land suggested for Rail Deck Park. (I prefer the park.)

  • blogTO notes the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough is set to expand and move to a new location.

  • Opposition--ill-grounded opposition, I would say--to a new wind energy project in Prince Edward County is growing. Global News reports.

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  • Universe Today reports on the potential game-changing nature of a hyperloop connecting Toronto and Montréal.

  • Hacking of the brain is an obvious risk of two-way brain/Internet interfaces. From VICE.

  • Puerto Rico's ongoing economic crisis has only been worsened by Hurricane Maria. Bloomberg reports.

  • The problem with the German economy, strong as it may be now, is that not enough has been invested in the future. Bloomberg warns.

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  • The mixture of high- and low-end real estate on High Park Avenue might be a model for Toronto. Tess Kalinowski reports.

  • There are quite a few different proposals for replacements of the streetcar linking Union Station to Queens Quay.

  • Edward Keenan argues that, however Union Station or Queens Quay are linked, the link should be funded adequately.

  • The Globe and Mail reports on how the arrival of rent control is leading to the early conversion of rental units to condos.

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  • In this unseasonably warm September, Toronto tenants need more air conditioning than some landlords provide. The Toronto Star reports.

  • NOW Toronto notes the launch of a new Kent Monkman canvas, this one depicting a Dutch-Iroquois treaty signing.

  • The bizarre story of an ISIS supporter who tried to attack people at a Canadian Tire store is getting more bizarre. The Toronto Star reports.

  • There is a possibility the Ontario minimum wage increase could hurt employment outside of well-off Toronto. The Globe and Mail reports.

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  • While I get why the TTC would promote its top ranking on its vehicles, the optics of significant cost for this promotion are terrible.

  • Bay and Bloor, Avenue Road and Bloor, Bay and King--these are the top intersections for condo resellers.

  • I get why Bombardier workers would want to support their employer versus Bombardier with a brief strike, and be justified in doing so. Just--well, optics.

  • Can the Centreville carousel be kept in Toronto? I suppose it would be nice if they could get the funding.

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  • Anthrodendum offers resources for understanding race in the US post-Charlottesville.

  • D-Brief notes that exoplanet WASP-12b is a hot Jupiter that is both super-hot and pitch-black.

  • The Dragon's Gaze links to a paper examining various models of ice-covered worlds and their oceans' habitability.

  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the value placed by society on different methods of transport.

  • Far Outliers looks at how Chinese migrants were recruited in the 19th century.

  • Hornet Stories notes that the authorship of famously bad fanfic, "My Immortal", has been claimed, by one Rose Christo.

  • Marginal Revolution notes one explanation for why men are not earning more. (Bad beginnings matter.)

  • Peter Watts has it with facile (and statistically ill-grounded) rhetoric about punching Nazis.

  • At the NYR Daily, Masha Gessen is worried by signs of degeneration in the American body politic.

  • Livejournal's pollotenchegg maps the strength of Ukrainian political divisions in 2006 and 2010.

  • The Power and the Money's Noel Maurer is afraid what AI-enabled propaganda might do to American democracy in the foreseeable future.

  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an enjoyable bagel breakfast at Pondichéry's Auroville Café.

  • Drew Rowsome celebrates the introduction of ultra-low-cost carriers for flyers in Canada.

  • Strange Company notes the 19th century haunting of an English mill.

  • Window on Eurasia notes that Crimean Tatars, and Muslims in Crimea, are facing more repression.

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  • Far Outliers notes how the new Suez Canal helped create a network of coal-using port cities across Eurasia.

  • Hornet Stories notes that Serbia's out lesbian Prime Minister, Ana Brnabic, marched in Belgrade's pride parade.

  • Joe. My. God. notes a statement by the Pentagon that transgender troops can still re-enlist for the next few months.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes a fundamentally ill-thought defense of colonialism by Bruce Gilley.

  • Marginal Revolutions notes that Swedish support for the far right is linked to perceptions of foreign threats to employment.

  • Out There looks at the last days of Cassini at Saturn.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw notes real estate shenanigans in greater Sydney.

  • Drew Rowsome has a critical, but positive, review of closeted gay author Frank M. Robinson's autobiography.

  • The Volokh Conspiracy sums up the outcome of the controversial monkey selfie copyright case.

  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russian challenges to language legislation in Tatarstan hint at future challenges.

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  • Anthrodendum considers the difficulties of the anthropologist in the context of a world where their knowledges are monetized.

  • The Broadside Blog's Caitlin Kelly talks about two days she spent in Montréal, with photos.

  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion about the justice, or lack thereof, in Harvard denying convicted murderer Michelle Jones entry into their doctoral program now that her sentence is over.

  • D-Brief looks at the changing nature of the global disease burden, and its economic consequences.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that Equifax's terribly lax data protection should mark the endgame for them.

  • The Map Room Blog considers the use of earth-observer satellites to predict future disease outbreaks (malaria, here, in Peru).

  • Starts With A Bang's Ethan Siegel notes how quantum mechanics helps explain nuclear fusion in our sun.

  • Window on Eurasia notes a report that Muscovites live on average 12 years longer than non-Muscovite Russians.

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  • Canadian cities could host Amazon's HQ2, but at considerable cost. Affordable housing, say, would be an issue.

  • Conor Sen argues that Amazon's HQ2 augurs an age of corporate diffusion beyond the largest centres.
  • Amazon Prime, Kaleigh Rogers notes, is hugely important for remote communities like those in the North. If it goes ...

  • Stacy Mitchell notes how, after Whole Foods, Amazon seems set to monopolize the whole infrastructure of commerce.

  • Is Jessica Bruder's story of CamperForce, Amazon's RV-living army of elderly workers, a cheering story of triumph over adversity or a scary take on the future of work? I'm not sure.

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  • Building two thousand affordable housing units in Toronto is a nice step forward. Will there be more steps? The Toronto Star reports.

  • This charming bit of improvised art down at Humber Bay Park reminds me that I really need to head down there. From the Toronto Star.

  • Montréal has stopped representing genocidal General Amherst on its flag, replacing it with a native pine tree. The National Post reports.

  • Emily Macrae at Torontoist suggests co-housing, drawn from a Québec model, is something Toronto might want to look into.

  • Richard Longley at NOW Toronto explores the Toronto Islands. Do they have a future? What will they need?

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning deep-field pictures of intergalactic space.

  • Centauri Dreams shares the second part of Larry Klaes' analysis of Forbidden Planet.

  • D-Brief suggests that controlled kangaroo hunting may be necessary for the ecological health of Australia.

  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new radio telescope in British Columbia that may help solve the mystery of fast radio burst.

  • The Dragon's Gaze notes that quasars can irradiate a noteworthy fraction of potentially Earth-like planets.

  • Lawyers, Guns and Money comes out against the idea of giving Amazon massive tax breaks for HQ2.

  • The LRB Blog bids a fond farewell to Saturn probe Cassini.

  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting new ideas--hence, new sources of economic growth--are harder to come by.

  • Maximos62 recounts a quietly chilling trip to East Timor where he discovers a landscape marked by genocide.

  • The New APPS Blog is quite unsurprised by news that Russians may have used Facebook to manipulate the US election.

  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane bids a fond farewell to colleague Len Wein.

  • Personal Reflections' Jim Belshaw does not think Australia is committed enough to affordable housing to solve homelessness Finland-style.

  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the Suwalki Gap, the thin corridor joining the Baltic States to Poland.

  • Peter Rukavina looks at how a storied land rover was recovered from St. Helena.

  • Starts With A Bang's Ethan Siegel lists the top six discoveries of Cassini at Saturn.

  • Towleroad notes fundamentally misaimed criticism of new AI that determines sexual orientation from facepics.

  • Window on Eurasia looks at contemporary Russian fears about the power of rising China in Russia's Asian territories.

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I've a post up at Demography Matters reflecting briefly on Masahiro Hidaka's Bloomberg article "Japan's Richest Village Can't Find Workers for Its Factory". In this article, Hidaka describes how the village of Sarufutsu, northernmost village in Hokkaido and thus all Japan, is facing a shutdown of its hugely profitable scallops fishery because it is literally running out of workers.

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